Archive for the ‘Joe Giambrone’ Category


UPDATE 1

Political Film Blog has REAPPEARED since last night, when I began complaining.

How to battle a monolith with that level of tactical power at its disposal?


UPDATE 2

Disappeared again! If you look closely, the wordpress version of this blog is not on page one search results, despite three other versions of this blog appearing correctly at the top.


I just scrolled through 12–count them–12 Google search result pages to find the first direct link to The Political Film Blog, by searching “political film blog.” You can try it yourself.

And you KNOW they deliberately disappeared it because other versions of this site do appear at the top, including the Facebook version and the Tumbler version, as well as a Medium page that I launched but haven’t kept up with.

But this domain is invisible all the way to page 12, where some irrelevant page here is linked for no discernible reason.

Google used to seem honest and trustworthy. Not anymore.

J. Giambrone

Midsommar Review

Okay, so the most trite buzzline imaginable is: Wicker Man for anthropology students. Now I know that’s reductionist assholery, but on a base level it could be perceived that way. They are literal anthropology students doing anthropology student stuff. This does bog it down a bit. And while some of the horror aesthetics annoyed me at the beginning, I was turned around when the contingent made their trek to northern Sweden.

THE WICKER MAN (1973)

Because, while The Wicker Man was firmly set against the return to pagan ritualism, Midsommar seems on the fence. Where spills and chills poured naturally from the conflict against the English detective and his invasion of their lands, in Midsommar it’s not all malevolence–or is it? There’s a sales pitch that accompanies the human sacrifices. I did like that part.

And the unstated anti-sales pitch for American “bros” and their culture deserves a nod. The…

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6 Stars



Arguably the best movie I have ever seen, you would be a fool to miss this. I must have seen between 3 and 5 thousand of the bastards.

This is bold, beautiful, and a masterpiece. Edgar Wright is now at the top of his game. Anya-Taylor Joy just delivers flawlessly. And the plot is quite a ride.

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I should mention my own project Time of Death has a similar worlds touching through a ghostly connection thing. It’s also about a first-year, unstable, artsy student. So, I was hooked entirely, as Edgar did it so well. The technical side is ahead of the viewer by far.

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You don’t need to know any more and risk spoilers reading internet crap like this. Just go see it.

Joe Giambrone, publisher of Political Film Blog

Hell of a Deal was the first book I decided to publish, back in 2009. It is a satire of the “War on Terror” and Hollywood’s incessant propaganda to push empire, domination, torture, and war crimes. Hollywood, quite frankly, sickened me to my core and I had to respond in some way.

This book is more Gulliver than John Wick, more Faust than Charlie’s Angels. At the start, I wanted so badly to crucify the main guy, Executive Producer Al Smith. He was to represent the worst of Hollywood profiteering at the cost of all our souls. After hitting the movie lottery in the late 60s, his career evolved over the decades to promote more extreme degradation and nationalism, especially as we entered the Age of Terror. And that’s where Seaford stepped in.

The story needed a guy to push the envelope, to abandon the self-imposed limitations, which Hollywood had placed on itself, and to see how far these trends could go. So, as the title implied, it was literally about a deal–a movie deal. Only, nothing was what it seemed. The deal was not about money, and profit was the last thing Seaford cared about. It was all about the messaging, the propaganda, the final cut, the access into your brains.

By the time Seaford arrived on the movie scene, Al Smith was already old and on his last legs. He was dying. His time was over, almost. There was one thing that could possibly turn things around for him, and that was medical science. This was what Seaford brought to the table: “Youth.”

These pieces all fit together like a well-oiled machine. Just thinking on it, I knew I had something special here. Firstly, I had something to say. Secondly, I had a Faustian bargain plot like no one had ever seen before. In this Faustian story, things are meant to look one way, fairly normal even in the current normality. But things were far from normal.

As I said, I wanted Al Smith to suffer, but strangely that only brought the story so far. The story itself cried out for some kind of redemption. Could I flip everything and become sympathetic to Smith? What would he need to do?

In the end, perhaps some might think him redeemed. Others not. It’s potentially ambiguous, and with a big Hollywood ending.

Read:

Hell of a Deal


Hello Peoples, I’m back after a long absence to move across the country and reinvent my life. It has been personally, let’s say, distracting. I may have fallen victim to a propaganda campaign so vast, so coordinated, that it rivals the Weapons of Mass Destruction deception in scale.

I too thought Ivermectin was just a “horse dewormer,” and then dismissed it. Not so.

It is an essential, cheap, life-saving HUMAN drug that has been prescribed billions of times around the world and appears to have some effect in fighting Covid-19.

The sheer volume and coordinated journalistic malfeasance around this deliberate smear campaign are shocking. But, Jimmy Dore is on the case with one of the country’s top virologists.

PS.

Just because it’s cheap doesn’t mean it actually works.

Ivermectin Controversy & Retracted Studies

I took my time watching and then reviewing this. It’s heavy duty, and I wasn’t in a deep mood to handle this film. Not for a couple of weeks.

Keira Knightly plays Katharine Gun, and the result is a tense political thriller, and also a newsroom hunt and a courtroom drama. It’s quite powerful, and I actually missed the key scene because of a DVD scratch. Still I urge everyone to watch this if just to keep up on the relevant history you’re living through.

I don’t feel right about giving spoilers. So, I won’t even post the trailer. Trust me. This is an important film.

I may do a Zuckerberg / Big Brother mashup.

FACEBOOK just got stuck “Posting,” in order to not post and censor out U.S. war crimes from being communicated there. The description also disappeared, and it went something like this…

The real reason Julian Assange is in a British prison without charge is for revealing US war crimes. The Collateral Murder video shows a US helicopter murdering civilians, including a Reuters cameraman and a van full of children that arrived on the scene to give aid.

censored
Collateral Murder

datz right muddafuckas

Plus

Sad news. Erik Myers died, in a car accident. Myers was one of the greatest American stand-ups around. Don’t believe me?

In the form of a “Support Message,” can you hear George Orwell’s snicker?

Anything challenging the political orthodoxy of Facebook & friends is purged, censored from YOU. You are ultimately the reason for this censorship regime. You are not allowed to think.

WHY ISIS EXISTS: THE DOUBLE GAME. (2015)

Do tell. Comments are always open here.

WRECKING BALLS

Let’s see your book reviews, if you think it’s so easy.

Anyone interested in hard scifi has to watch Westworld. It’s the biggest production that exists, as far as I know. They have now spanned the world and brought the future, and it’s one of the few actual mind-blowing projects.

The theme is freedom, what it means, what it doesn’t mean, and the struggle that is both real and vividly imagined, how they cross over. The term they used was “algorithmic determinism.”

My love has been professed for Evan Rachel Wood, and I just learned she’s a black belt in tae kwon do. Of course she is.

The show shot in Singapore, Spain, the west, and thirty years in the future. It’s bigger than life, and the story crackles because of Jonathan Nolan, Christopher’s brother who obsesses over the Inception mutli-threaded strings of plots. It quickly grows more complicated. It’s not like easy to follow linear stories. They are constantly asking the big questions.

It starts off slow-burn and building in complexity. By the end of the season, it’s massive in scale. I really don’t think that anyone who ended up here needs any more convincing.