Posts Tagged ‘American’

_1406928938

The politics of Iron Man: how Marvel sold an arms dealing billionaire to liberal America

Your new friend is an arms dealer?”

“Yeah, but he’s a solid guy.”

“Are you sure he’s not a super villain?”

“No, no. He’s a good guy. He really is a good guy.”

M110 7.62 × 51mm Suppressed American Sniper rifle DA-SD-06-03422

I had literally searched Youtube for the same clip today, to make the same comparison. The scene where Adolf is yukking it up in the theater, just loving the glorious SS sniper. But this is so much better, and will reverberate…

Seth Rogan Basically Calls “American Sniper” Movie A Nazi Propaganda Film

9,000 favorites!

The scene with Hitler is not online, due to copyright, but this is…

Isis fighters drive a US-made Humvee  along the streets of Syria's northern Raqqa province

Heckuva job, Barrie…

www.indiewire.com

Blood in the Face

Yay for ignorant racism.

“We’re more Nazi than the Nazis.”

 

anthrax200-4fb7972d257056ed1fd6aee68b38e0249028755f-s6-c30

 

 

We have a blogroll on the side bar.  I had neglected to add William Blum’s Anti Empire Report, but have since corrected that.  Blum’s hard hitting reality report consistently shreds the popular corporate myths most people mindlessly live under.

Only the best stuff makes the cut on the blogroll.

killinghope_300_463

 

 

Trailer

Grassroots Solutions to American Crises
By BENJAMIN DANGL

When the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression hit the US on September 15, 2008, filmmakers Sílvia Leindecker and Michael Fox began a journey across the country to see how the economy was impacting people’s lives. Their interviews, which span two years and nearly 40 states, draw from farmers, truck drivers, homeless people, workers, immigrants and more. The result is the documentary Crossing the American Crises: From Collapse To Action, a film full of desperation, hope and grassroots solutions.

Leindecker and Fox are the makers of the earlier documentary Beyond Elections: Redefining Democracy in the Americas, and Fox was an editor of the book Venezuela Speaks!: Voices From The Grassroots. Like these earlier works, Crossing the American Crises highlights the voices of people participating in grassroots activism and everyday struggles for a better world.

The first stop of their trip is Detroit, where the camera cuts to empty store fronts and factories. “Detroit is what it is because of industry and the industrial revolution, and capitalism, and so-called democracy and how all those failed. And this is what we have left with it,” Jon Blount of the activist collective Detroit Summer tells Leindecker and Fox. Such bits of hard-won insight from streets, factory floors and living rooms across America are interspersed throughout the film.

The next visit is to the Rosebud Lakota Indian Reservation in South Dakota, where they speak with Alfred Bone Shirt. “We’re seeing that there’s a danglsegment of our society that feel we’re left out, neglected, abused; rights are violated. We’re in a depression down here so bad that people just wanna give up.” His words are underscored by footage of the reservation itself, a place crushed by economic depression.

After stops in Utah, Oakland and Los Angeles, they head out onto Route 66, where, Fox tells the camera they want to “see the direct effects on the local community.” And indeed, that is what they find at nearly every stop in their tour; very real life stories of how the US economy is making life difficult for people from coast to coast and everywhere in between.

In New Orleans, they speak with people in the Lower 9th Ward, a neighborhood that was destroyed by Katrina in 2005. Robert Green and his family lived in this community for 38 years before Katrina hit, and at the time of the shooting of the film they were still living in a FEMA trailer. Green is interviewed with his daughter and wife next to a string of empty lots – places where his neighbors’ homes used to be located before the storm destroyed them.

Fox asks Green what he thinks about the government bailout, the major issue of the day. Green tells him, “It’s ironic that it only took [the government] two weeks to issue a $700 billion check. It took them three years after Katrina and this is what you see.” He pointed to the empty lots, saying the names of the families that used to live there. “So basically every house, every family that’s gone actually was a family that should be here now. And if they would have been given the money in two weeks like the way they did in Congress, the way they did in Wall Street, then every last one of these families would have rebuilt their houses, and this whole Gulf Coast area would have been rebuilt because everybody in the Gulf Coast is basically like the people down here: family first.”
Continue