Posts Tagged ‘Bin Laden’

The lobby of the CIA Headquarters Building in McLean, Virginia

 

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And I’m going to keep pasting this link to the NY Times…

Saudis Bankroll Taliban, Even as King Officially Supports Afghan Government

 

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…where in the world is Ayman Zawahiri???

Nafeez Ahmed sets the record straight in a massive article. This is must-read, from 2015:

Official history of raid camouflages US protection of governments behind 9/11

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The plot sickens…

CIA director Leon Panetta asked Boal to alert the agency if he ever traveled to the country. At the time, Boal was working on a movie called Tora Bora, about the CIA’s failure to capture Osama bin Laden in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. The title referred to the region in eastern Afghanistan where the US felt it had let bin Laden slip through its fingers during a battle in December 2001.

But less than two weeks after Boal made the call, a team of Navy SEALs raided the al Qaeda leader’s compound in Pakistan and killed him. Boal would not be going to Afghanistan after all.

Executive Producer Leon Panetta hands Boal the Osama bin Laden murder fairy tale, and Tora Bora is never made.

Tora Bora was when they let Al Qaeda escape to Pakistan when the USAF could easily have bombed their caravan and shot down the Pakistani aircraft flying them out. That’s the story the CIA wasn’t so eager to see on big screens.

Tequila, Painted Pearls, and Prada: How the CIA Helped Produce ‘Zero Dark Thirty’

The Scandal:

Zero Dark Thirty Scandal Files

Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh gestures during a panel discussion on "The Challenges of Reporting About Iraq" at the Associated Press Managing Editors annual conference in San Jose, Calif., Friday, Oct. 28, 2005. Deteriorating security in Iraq has made covering the war and reconstruction efforts exceedingly difficult, and this isn't helping efforts to give readers the coverage they need to understand what's really going on, a panel of journalists said Friday. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

Investigative reporter Seymour Hersh gestures during a panel discussion on “The Challenges of Reporting About Iraq” at the Associated Press Managing Editors annual conference in San Jose, Calif., Friday, Oct. 28, 2005. Deteriorating security in Iraq has made covering the war and reconstruction efforts exceedingly difficult, and this isn’t helping efforts to give readers the coverage they need to understand what’s really going on, a panel of journalists said Friday. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

“Allies” were guarding and funding America’s worst enemy

AP PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO PROVIDED BY COLUMBIA PICTURES INDUSTRIES, INC. FOR EDITORIAL PURPOSES ONLY. © 2012 COLUMBIA PICTURES INDUSTRIES, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO SALES. 6 MONTHS USE FROM JAN. 10, 2013. This undated publicity photo released by Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. shows Navy SEALs seen through the greenish glow of night vision goggles, as they prepare to breach a locked door in Osama Bin Laden's compound in Columbia Pictures' hyper-realistic new action thriller from director Kathryn Bigelow,

AP PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED HANDOUT PHOTO PROVIDED BY COLUMBIA PICTURES INDUSTRIES, INC. FOR EDITORIAL PURPOSES ONLY. © 2012 COLUMBIA PICTURES INDUSTRIES, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO SALES. 6 MONTHS USE FROM JAN. 10, 2013. This undated publicity photo released by Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. shows Navy SEALs seen through the greenish glow of night vision goggles, as they prepare to breach a locked door in Osama Bin Laden’s compound in Columbia Pictures’ hyper-realistic new action thriller from director Kathryn Bigelow, “Zero Dark Thirty.” (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., Jonathan Olley)ictures Industries, Inc., Jonathan Olle

One of America’s all-time top investigative journalists has been banished to the London Review of Books in order to get his exposés published.
The Killing of Osama bin Laden

Seymour M. Hersh:

A worrying factor at this early point, according to the retired official, was Saudi Arabia, which had been financing bin Laden’s upkeep since his seizure by the Pakistanis. ‘The Saudis didn’t want bin Laden’s presence revealed to us because he was a Saudi, and so they told the Pakistanis to keep him out of the picture. The Saudis feared if we knew we would pressure the Pakistanis to let bin Laden start talking to us about what the Saudis had been doing with al-Qaida. And they were dropping money – lots of it. The Pakistanis, in turn, were concerned that the Saudis might spill the beans about their control of bin Laden. The fear was that if the US found out about bin Laden from Riyadh, all hell would break out. The Americans learning about bin Laden’s imprisonment from a walk-in was not the worst thing.’

Despite their constant public feuding, American and Pakistani military and intelligence services have worked together closely for decades on counterterrorism in South Asia. Both services often find it useful to engage in public feuds ‘to cover their asses’, as the retired official put it, but they continually share intelligence used for drone attacks, and co-operate on covert operations. At the same time, it’s understood in Washington that elements of the ISI believe that maintaining a relationship with the Taliban leadership inside Afghanistan is essential to national security. The ISI’s strategic aim is to balance Indian influence in Kabul; the Taliban is also seen in Pakistan as a source of jihadist shock troops who would back Pakistan against India in a confrontation over Kashmir.

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“At one point our secret services simply detected direct contacts between militants from the North Caucasus and representatives of the United States secret services in Azerbaijan,” Putin said in the film, released by Rossiya 1 TV channel on Sunday.

“And when I spoke about that to the then president of the US, he said… sorry, I will speak plainly, he said, “I’ll kick their asses”, Putin recounts his conversation with George W. Bush on the issue. A few days later, he says, the heads of Russia’s FSB received a letter from their American counterparts, which said they had the right to support opposition forces in Russia.

“Someone over there, especially the West’s intelligence services, obviously thought that if they act to destabilize their main geopolitical rival, which, as we now understand, in their eyes has always been Russia, it would be good for them. It turned out, it wasn’t,” Putin muses, saying he had warned the West about the possible dangers of supporting terrorists.

Putin accuses US of backing North Caucasus militants

I brought up much background on the Chechen situation in my article on the Boston Bombing (must read):

Is This the Man Who “Radicalized” Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?

There is also a direct 9/11 tie in to the US support for Chechen terrorists connected to Osama bin Laden:

An FBI memo already established al Khattab as an Al Qaeda terrorist, but the investigation of Moussaoui’s laptop was denied to the FBI Minneapolis officers and to Coleen Rowley, the legal advisor there. “True, there was an FBI memo on the FBI director Louis Freeh’s desk explicitly warning that terrorists linked to Khattab and Bin Laden were planning a major attack, but the memo was dismissed, and the FBI man in Washington DC, who should have seen that memo but claims he didn’t, rebuffed Minneapolis and shut down their requests for a warrant to look in Moussaoui’s laptop.”