Posts Tagged ‘class war’

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Joe Biden is propped up by the billionaire class to protect their interests and attack Bernie Sanders. It’s crystal clear.

“I’m not Bernie Sanders,” Joe Biden said at the Brookings Institution. “I don’t think 500 billionaires are the reason why we’re in trouble. The folks at the top are not bad guys… wealthy Americans are just as patriotic as poor folks.”

But, of course, the billionaires are very much the problem increasing their share of the pie and leaving everyone else behind as they tirelessly corrupt the government at the local, state and national levels. Joe Biden is a despicable fraud who should go down in flames.

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Hero of the empire for shutting his mouth about material aid to terrorists.

 

This video should end his career as a Democrat, anyway. Watch the short video.

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Pelosi’s Deceptive Plan: Blocking any Tax Rise Could Rule Out Medicare-for-All and Bolstering Social Security

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“The average cost of cancer drugs today is four times the median household income.”

This is real class war.

 

A Nobel Prize-Winning Cancer Therapy Will Be Unaffordable for Most Americans. Public Pharmaceuticals Can Help Change That.

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by Joe Giambrone

 

The freedom of corporate shareholders to fire your ass and move your job to anywhere that pays less, that’s one of them. We’re going to keep it real now, okay?

Each year on July 4th, the working classes of America drink themselves into stupors and play with innocuous explosives in their driveways. To them, this is some kind of representation of “freedom.” Yes, they can blow up paper cylinders; what they cannot blow up is the system that holds them as wage slaves. Say “no” to your boss, and you are economically destroyed. Not so “free” at work it turns out.

America has a twisted, immoral relationship with the word “freedom.” Each war of the modern age has been disguised, inside mountains of propaganda, as an effort to bring so-called “freedom” to somebody somewhere. If they didn’t ask for it, well, that’s no concern.

Freedom is good because we say it is. We liberate a lot of oil and mineral wealth, which needs to break free and become corporate profit. That’s the kind of freedom that launches the Marines or the Special Forces to invade your land. This “freedom” is not a freedom for your people and their human rights, but the freedom of US big money investors to plunder your land’s resources.

This is proven beyond any reasonable doubt, in 2003, by Paul Bremer’s “100 Orders” of the occupying United States. These illegal “Orders” dismantled the entire government of Iraq and wrote in numerous rights for foreign investors. The entire enterprise remains an illegal war of aggression, and the profit motive of the invaders stands as evidence:

 

“Bremer implemented his “100 Orders” with the force of law, all but a handful of which remain in place today. As the preamble to many of the orders state, they are intended to “transition [Iraq] from a … centrally planned economy to a market economy” virtually overnight and by U.S. fiat.

Bremer’s orders included firing the entire Iraqi military–some half a million men–in the first weeks of the occupation. Suddenly jobless, many of these men took their guns with them and joined the violent insurgency. Bremer also fired 120,000 of Iraq’s senior bureaucrats from every government ministry, hospital and school. His laws allowed for the privatization of Iraq’s state-owned enterprises (excluding oil) and for American companies to receive preferential treatment over Iraqis in the awarding of reconstruction contracts. The laws reduced taxes on all corporations by 25 percent and opened every sector of the Iraqi economy to private foreign investment. The laws allowed foreign firms to own 100 percent of Iraqi businesses (as opposed to partnering with Iraqi firms) and to send their profits home without having to invest a cent in the struggling Iraqi economy. Iraqi laws governing banking, foreign investment, patents, copyrights, business ownership, taxes, the media, agriculture and trade were all changed to conform to U.S. goals.”
-Spoils of War, In These Times 

 

That’s the definition of “freedom,” literally, as George W. Bush told us so. That was why he launched the war. That is what he did to the nation of Iraq once it was defeated.

So, clearly, there are different types of freedom. There is what the prisoner yearns for, and there is what the CEO bribes politicians for. Do not confuse them, as that is how propaganda turns freedom to slavery, peace to war, intelligence to idiocy.

Corporate CEOs in the Trump era are stockpiling freedom too. They want freedom to destroy unions, thus disempowering their workers further. They want the freedom to pollute the air and water more than it is already polluted. They want the freedom to keep all the profits for themselves and externalize all the costs onto the lower classes. They even want the freedom to steal American’s Social Security trust fund.

Criminals absolutely love freedom, as it gives them a window of opportunity to pounce.

This July 4th watch the words. Watch your ass.

 

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by Ellen Brown

This is the second in a two-part article on the debt burden America’s students face. Read Part 1 here.

The lending business is heavily stacked against student borrowers. Bigger players can borrow for almost nothing, and if their investments don’t work out, they can put their corporate shells through bankruptcy and walk away. Not so with students. Their loan rates are high and if they cannot pay, their debts are not normally dischargeable in bankruptcy. Rather, the debts compound and can dog them for life, compromising not only their own futures but the economy itself.

“Students should not be asked to pay more on their debt than they can afford,” said Donald Trump on the presidential campaign trail in October 2016. “And the debt should not be an albatross around their necks for the rest of their lives.” But as Matt Taibbi points out in a December 15 article, a number of proposed federal changes will make it harder, not easier, for students to escape their debts, including wiping out some existing income-based repayment plans, harsher terms for graduate student loans, ending a program to cancel the debt of students defrauded by ripoff diploma mills, and strengthening “loan rehabilitation” – the recycling of defaulted loans into new, much larger loans on which the borrower usually winds up paying only interest and never touching the principal. The agents arranging these loans can get fat commissions of up to 16 percent, an example of the perverse incentives created in the lucrative student loan market. Servicers often profit more when borrowers default than when they pay smaller amounts over a longer time, so they have an incentive to encourage delinquencies, pushing students into default rather than rescheduling their loans. It has been estimated that the government spends $38 for every $1 it recovers from defaulted debt. The other $37 goes to the debt collectors.

The securitization of student debt has compounded these problems. Like mortgages, student loans have been pooled and packaged into new financial products that are sold as student loan asset-backed securities (SLABS). Although a 2010 bill largely eliminated private banks and lenders from the federal student loan business, the “student loan industrial complex” has created a $200 billion market that allows banks to cash in on student loans without issuing them. About 80 percent of SLABS are government-guaranteed. Banks can sell, trade or bet on these securities, just as they did with mortgage-backed securities; and they create the same sort of twisted incentives for loan servicing that occurred with mortgages.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), virtually all borrowers with federal student loans are currently eligible to make monthly payments indexed to their earnings. That means there should be no defaults among student borrowers. Yet one in four borrowers is now in default or struggling to stay current. Why? Student borrowers are reporting widespread mishandling of accounts, unexplained exorbitant fees, and outright deception as they are bullied into default, tactics similar to those that homeowners faced in the foreclosure crisis. The reports reveal a repeat of the abuses of the foreclosure fraud era: many borrowers are unable to obtain basic information about their accounts, are frequently misled, are surprised with unexpected late fees, and often are pushed into default. Servicers lose paperwork or misapply payments. When errors arise, borrowers find it difficult to have them corrected.

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