Posts Tagged ‘corruption’

hillary

 

 

stack of money.png

TAKE ACTION! Ask your Member of Congress and Senators to remove the Monsanto Promotion Act. Tell them you don’t want your taxes to be spent on corporate welfare or industry propaganda, especially not to promote Monsanto’s GMOs!

Don’t Let Congress Give Your Money to Monsanto!

 

014641-john-kiriakou-122114.jpg

My Lunch With an FBI Whistleblower, Not Yet Out

By John Kiriakou, Reader Supported News

11 April 16

 

had lunch with an FBI agent last week. If you don’t know me, that’s a highly unusual event. I hate the FBI. I hate what they’ve done to civil liberties in the United States. I hate that they spy on peace activists, civil libertarians, and people of color, all under the guise of “national security.” I hate the FBI’s dirty history of COINTELPRO, of sending poison pen letters to Martin Luther King Jr. to try to get him to commit suicide. I hate that they tried to set me up on an espionage charge because they knew that the case against me for blowing the whistle on the CIA’s torture program was weak. But I was intrigued.

The FBI agent in question told me that he had uncovered evidence of waste, fraud, abuse, and illegality at the Bureau. He said that he had reported this untoward behavior up his chain of command and was told to mind his own business. He went to the FBI Inspector General and the FBI General Counsel, and was told both times that he should walk away, that he should mind his own business. He wanted to know what I thought he should do, based on my own experience.

I told him that he could do one of several things. He could continue up the chain of command and go to the Senate or House Judiciary Committees. If he did that, there would certainly be an internal investigation, he would be ostracized at the FBI, and he would likely face spurious charges that could include espionage. That’s what the CIA and the FBI did to me, to NSA’s Tom Drake, to the CIA’s Jeffrey Sterling, to the State Department’s Stephen Kim, and others.

I told him that he could go to the press, in which case there would also be an investigation, his security clearance would be suspended, and he would likely be fired, at least, for insubordination. He also could be charged with espionage or any number of national security charges related to leaking.

I told him that he could talk to an attorney who specializes in national security whistleblowing cases, like Jesselyn Radack of ExposeFacts. Radack is a fearless advocate for national security professionals who take their oaths to uphold and defend the Constitution seriously. She is also a whistleblower. She lost her job as a Justice Department ethics officer after insisting that John Walker Lindh, known in the press as the “American Taliban,” be allowed access to an attorney, a basic constitutional right that the FBI denied him.

And finally, I told him that he could do nothing. Just keep quiet. He would keep his job, his pay grade, and his clearances. But he wouldn’t be able to sleep at night.

The FBI agent, deep down, knew all these things. He recalled the recent case of another FBI whistleblower, Darin Jones, who was fired after he blew the whistle on waste, fraud, and abuse at the Bureau. Jones said that FBI bigwigs had blown $234,000 of the taxpayers’ money on an awards ceremony for themselves, they had improperly spent taxpayer money without going through proper channels, and that a former FBI assistant director had had a conflict of interest related to a computer help-desk contract.

What did Jones do? He went through the chain of command. He complained to his superiors about the waste, fraud, and abuse he saw. In response, he was fired on the last day of his probationary period. That was three and a half years ago. His appeal still hasn’t been heard. And as with other whistleblowers, especially those in the national security arena, it has been virtually impossible for Jones to find work, and former friends and colleagues avoid him. He has described himself as “radioactive,” a non-person.

Congress, over the years, has toyed with the idea of enhanced protections for FBI whistleblowers. The chairman and ranking Democrat of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Senators Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Pat Leahy (D-Vermont), have introduced the FBI Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act, which would expand the number of people at the FBI eligible for whistleblower protection and would allow them to appeal dismissal in the court system. The problem is that the bill has languished in the Senate and has not come up for a vote. It likely won’t this year. Meanwhile, the House has ignored it.

The bottom line is this: Jones, the FBI agent with whom I met, and others who report on FBI malfeasance internally are screwed. There really are no protections. It’s the same in national security. A potential whistleblower can go through the chain of command and likely be charged with crimes, he can go to the press and likely be charged with crimes, or he can keep his mouth shut. There are no alternatives. And until Congress recognizes the patent unfairness of the current system, other good and patriotic men and women will be ruined for doing the right thing.

 


John Kiriakou is an associate fellow with the Institute for Policy Studies. He is a former CIA counterterrorism officer and a former senior investigator with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

220px-Thebigheatmp.JPG

 

On Crackle Now

by Kim Niccolini

I don’t need to tell you that the multiplex is dead. I am a girl who will see just about anything at the movies. I have spent my lifetime going to movies. But even me, the girl who can almost find something remotely redeemable to see at the multiplex, has stopped going. It’s that bad.

So I’m lucky to live in a town that has an independent non-profit cinema –The Loft – which not only shows independent and foreign films but that also screens classic movies on actual film. Currently they are showing a film noir series focusing primarily on tales of cops and corruption. They opened the series with Fritz Lang’s The Big Heat (1953) which tells the story of tough cop Dave Bannion (Glenn Ford) trying to take down the corrupt world of the mob and its marriage with law enforcement. Certainly the link between cops and crime is nothing new in the movies. It is as relevant today as it was when it was first explored in early gangster films such as Little Caesar (1931) and Scarface(1932) and when it was so brutally detailed in Frances Ford Coppola’s first two Godfather films (1972 and 1974). If you look to the movies as a model, in the past they have rarely pulled any punches in equating politics with crime and erasing the line between good and bad. Movies have been a great vehicle for showing the inherent corruption of the American capitalist system, whether legit or not. Criminals are cops, and cops are criminals, and in the end all systems – mafia or government – are out for the same things: money and power. Of course, that means money and power for the world of men, not women.

Keep on reading!

 

untitled

Fucking Republicans

“I’m a registered Republican,” she said.

And none of this would have mattered to her in the slightest except it happened to her, to her son. There’s no problem with corporate control and deregulation until your family gets sick and dies. That’s how Republicans roll. They look the other way at corruption until that corruption affects their own family. It has to personally impact them before the horror of the situation becomes real. They lack fundamental empathy and reasoning skills. They are like programmed drones, programmed to think in ideological cliches until the results of their programming suddenly fail them, or someone they love. Not until.

It’s the same old God damned fucking story. And it is exactly what got us here.

monfield.jpg

Food Inc. is one of those blood curdling investigations of big business and its control of our food supply. It’s the story of corruption, monopoly, subsidies and disease.

Essentially the government has subsidized corn so that it is overproduced and shoved into everything. We need to end these subsidies. Stop paying for food we don’t need and that isn’t healthy. Stop subsidizing giant corporations so that they can control our food and squeeze out all the small competitors. Stop the corruption.

“The industrial food is not honest food.”

Sums up the situation.

The film moves onto Monsanto’s evil empire of Terminator Seeds (TM), the RoundUp assault, and the corporate war on independent farmers. These subjects are covered in other films, and this seems like a general audience intro to the subject of corporate food. It’s not novel, but it is thorough in covering its bases.

Of course, Americans are largely too stupid to demand the Right to Know what the hell they’re eating and feeding to their children. I remember the California ballot measure, and I was on my campus giving out information. The bullshit industry propaganda had already reached the sheeple. Some of them argued in favor of systemic ignorance, against their own interests and on behalf of GMO manufacturers.

How did our society become so propagandized that educated people go to absurd lengths to fight against their own right to know what’s in their food? Mis-educated, I suppose, would be more accurate.

The legal assault, the batteries of lawyers abusing the law, openly fascistic corporate/state power abuses, is the chilling final section of Food Inc. Farmers cannot stand up to any of these multinational monsters. Legal fees quickly mount, $25k, $400k, over a million dollars! They can sue just to send a message. This is the expression of fascism, which Mussolini defined as corporatism. Corporations using government to abuse the people, that’s fascism. That’s America.

The movie tries to strike an upbeat final note. Consumers got Walmart to introduce organic products. It is difficult however to swallow an upbeat ending to such a devastating and sickening main event.

 

 

Full Film?

972af1e198eeaacc9ba273138c709eb63c371886.jpg

Isn’t this conspiracy?

These were not the only relationships bridging leaders of the two nations. In the years before Hillary Clinton became secretary of state, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia contributed at least $10 million to the Clinton Foundation, the philanthropic enterprise she has overseen with her husband, former president Bill Clinton. Just two months before the deal was finalized, Boeing — the defense [sic. WAR] contractor that manufactures one of the fighter jets the Saudis were especially keen to acquire, the F-15 — contributed $900,000 to the Clinton Foundation, according to a company press release.

The Saudi deal was one of dozens of arms sales approved by Hillary Clinton’s State Department that placed weapons in the hands of governments that had also donated money to the Clinton family philanthropic empire, an International Business Times investigation has found.

roundup_toxic-02

 

 

You mean they haven’t been all this time?

Heads should roll. Prosecutions for corruption, negligence and malfeasance should go forward.

FDA to Start Testing for Glyphosate in Food

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the nation’s chief food safety regulator, plans to start testing certain foods for residues of the world’s most widely used weed killer after the World Health Organization’s cancer experts last year declared the chemical a probable human carcinogen.

The FDA’s move comes amid growing public concern about the safety of the herbicide known as glyphosate, and comes after the U.S Government Accountability Office (GAO)rebuked the agency for failing to do such assessments and for not disclosing that short-coming to the public.

Private companies, academics, and consumer groups have recently launched their own testing and claim to have detected glyphosate residues in breast milk, honey, cereal, wheat flour, soy sauce, infant formula, and other substances.