Posts Tagged ‘downloading’

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Piracy on the High Sees: The Devaluation of Content

“You should come over one night,” said the man in the nice blue (and somewhat expensive looking) sweatshirt. “I have about 300 films I’ve downloaded.”

He laughed and then told me he hadn’t paid for even one… that he has some back channel way of getting them from a site that grabs them off of cable VOD services. And, he continued,“they look great… all in HD”!

“Don’t you think that’s thievery?” I asked

“No,” he said. “They’re there for the taking”.

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As this blog chronicles to the point of nausea: they can find you, the NSA and friends, that is. You can be tracked. You can be digitally fingerprinted, data mined, sued into bankruptcy and imprisoned. That’s why I don’t watch pirated movies. I pay my Netflix bill, and I watch ad-generated sites like Hulu, Break, and Crackle, occasionally.

As an author and creator I also respect the concept of Copyright. There needs to be a way for creative people to see some money at the end of the road, or else there won’t be production of more important works. The people won’t exist. They won’t be able to survive.

That said, I’m not crying for big movie studios…

Hollywood should be very afraid of Popcorn Time, the “Netflix for piracy”

There have been countless lawsuits against BitTorrent services and their users. Some, notably in Sweden, have been successful, even ending up in convictions. But in the US, asMother Jones reported a year ago, judges have been getting more skeptical about the evidence copyright holders present. Basically, an IP address—a number that identifies each computer connected to a network—is no longer considered such a reliable indicator of who has been actually downloading or uploading files.

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Filmmaker Alex Winter presents a radical and potentially disturbing take on the web beyond the law, the secretive parts of the internet nicknamed the “dark web.”

Winter already did a film favorable to Napster, calling it a “revolution” and giving a one-sided view of file sharing.

 

What strikes me is the total contempt and opposition to the music artists (and other copyright holders) who want to get paid so they can survive.   There is no balance to his presentation, and his fawning description of a web beyond the law, the realm of drugs, organized crime and terrorism, sort of gives pause.  Just what is he advocating?  Some laws are a good thing.

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I remember a documentary from 1970 about the Grateful Dead and Janis Joplin touring across Canada.  Just after Woodstock, when the massive crowds tore down the fences and the concert turned free – the bands met up with Canadian crowds who only wanted free concerts.  The kids tried to tear down fences in several shows, and Jerry Garcia discussed it with others about how the band needed to get paid so they could tour at all.   The musicians do need some compensation, and the expectation of free everything is childish and unrealistic, actually detrimental to all concerned.  If artists can’t survive then they will be out of the game.  Some compensation needs to be part of the system, or else it validates the claims of music corporations that downloading is “theft.”  Many people hate corporations with a knee jerk response, and the big ones deserve it.  But the musicians themselves are a part of this equation.

Alex Winter’s new project Deep Web is described here:

Deep Web: The Untold Story of BitCoin and The Silk Road

His pitch for a $10,000 sugar daddy is another moment to give pause.  Seems like someone oblivious that he’s playing with fire.  Or else he’s a bit of a pyromaniac.  Something to consider, anyway.

How can we balance the needs of free communications with the need to uphold the law and fight crime?  The new age is scary, for so many reasons.  The rise of hackers, government and corporate sponsored, as well as individuals and straight out criminals has us all at a disadvantage.  The modern condition is hackers 1, citizens 0.  As systems become more complex and pervasive that score is going to get a lot worse.

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SURVEY

Give your opinion.

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Creative Commons “license” is a limited form of Copyright — something the Pirate Bay itself militantly opposes, as it steals any and all content it can get away with.

CC-BY-NC-SA 

is code for “Attribution,” “Non-Commercial” and “Share Alike.”

Sounds like they have some qualms and some 2nd thoughts when it comes to their own productions?  No?

After all, if it is a free for all, and anything goes, why bother with Creative Commons stipulations?

New Pirate Bay movie trailer:

 

 

Busted: BitTorrent Pirates at Sony, Universal and Fox

With increasing lobbying efforts from the entertainment industry against BitTorrent sites and users, we wondered whether these companies hold themselves to the same standards they demand of others. After some initial skimming we’ve discovered BitTorrent pirates at nearly every major entertainment industry company in the US, including Sony Pictures Entertainment, Fox Entertainment and NBC Universal. Busted.

Read the whole piece. And get mad. Really mad. Don’t take it anymore.