Posts Tagged ‘feminism’

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by Dr Samita Nandy

The lack of sexual diversity in Hollywood has been a critical issue that gained wide attention among movie lovers and researchers. But, as a recent University of Southern California report shows, a real change in the industry is still required. In particular, Dr Katherine Pieper points out “raised voices and calls for change are important, but so are practical and strategic solutions based on research.”

So how can we implement solutions based on research, such as the one that USC proposes?  Is the research showing solutions for all female species?

Research often offers observations and critical analysis of existing case studies. There are several feminist cases to study, such as Julia Roberts not wearing high heels and Alicia Keys not using makeup on the red carpet. Publicity of Angelina Jolie’s mastectomy – the fact that breasts are not essential for her sense of being a woman – generated contested views in feminism. While Jennifer Aniston received attention for her feminist perspectives on the impacts of paparazzi photography, Keira Knightley posed nude to protest against the use of Photoshop and questioned idealistic images of women in Hollywood. Furthermore, Mindy Kaling and Priyanka Chopra have successfully used media channels to represent themselves as coloured women in Hollywood, thus resisting ableism in a wider context of social justice. What else can researchers do apart from studying actions that these female actors have already taken and have also inspired others to do?

Well, being a living example of change and bearing witness of violence are essential for social justice. But most fans often shift responsibility to Hollywood actors as idols of our society. 

Here, we are not talking about blockbuster films in Hollywood only. One must note that Hollywood is an abstract cultural space where filmmakers and film studies scholars co-exist through material and symbolic modes of communication in shared environments. Furthermore, critical questions on the female are not limited to humans but also apply to animals in our overall environment of social practices. In this respect one of the issues that is rarely addressed is how atrocity in ongoing circumcision of male pigs and grinding of live male chicks is overlooked while exploitation of female reproductive organs e.g., chicken breasts, milk, and eggs is glamorized. These practices lead to normalizing, naturalizing, and legitimizing exploitation of female body parts. The exploitations are completely overlooked in Hollywood representations of a ‘bacon and egg’ breakfast after a steamy sex scene, where female actors are far more exposed and consumed than their male counterparts.

Now the USC report argues “women were over three times as likely as their male counterparts to be shown partly nude or in sexually revealing clothing”. Why?

In The Sexual Politics of Meat, feminist author Dr Carol Adams points out that sexism and speciesism have the same roots of patriarchal oppression in a class-based society. Unless we use verbal and non-verbal means to resist violence against all females, women will be not only underrepresented but also be animalized.

We cannot fight for the freedom of one while oppressing the ‘Other’ in discourses of the female body. The intersections in sexism show that there is no single issue cause in Hollywood and beyond.

So how can we bring much-needed changes in Hollywood representations of women and feminists that fight for diverse social issues?

We need to show intersections, and not categorizations.

We need to show how sexism, classism, speciesism, and ableism among many other ideological practices are interconnected in Hollywood. Using the intersectional approach, we must be a living example of change and resist images and products that support exploitation. As Gandhi says, “be the change you want to see.”

Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies is hosting a live Twitter chat that will resist sexism and speciesism among many issues from 8:30 pm to 9 pm (EST) on October 13, 2016. CMCS will continue the debates and actions to be in Hollywood filmmaking at its 4th international conference at University of Southern California in Marsh 2017. Visit http://cmc-centre.com/conferences/losangeles/ for information on how to join and make a difference together.

Dr Samita Nandy
Director, Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) & Co-Producer,Celebrity Chat
Author, Fame in Hollywood North. Toronto: WaterHill Publishing
PhD Curtin University, Australia (Media / Celebrity)
MA and BA York University, Canada (Communication)
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alternet

AlterNet continues to wallow in stupidity. They claim:

“All-Female Ghostbusters Trailer Most Disliked in YouTube History Because Misogyny”

 

So everyone who isn’t wowed by that is a man pig. I see. And they lampoon the right for all the stupid shit THEY say?

The film relies on obvious, retreaded slapstick, the kind we’ve already seen too much of. Where it could have been more original it failed. It’s another Hollywood craptacular looking to milk audiences with borderline-retarded humor. How fresh.

Maybe it’s less about the gender and more about the level of immaturity behind what’s on screen? Is that possible, AlterNet?

No. Of course not. The world hates women, and that must be the reason. Apparently it was directed by a man and came out of a studio system dominated, as we are constantly told, by men…

 

adnanbaba

Inside the Weird World of an Islamic ‘Feminist’ Cult

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I rode past the theater last Thursday, shocked to see a line out to the parking lot, and almost to the sidewalk. I wondered if the new Hunger Games might be opening. But all these people were there for another stupid bloated fake cgi dinosaur pick-pocketing.

“No one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public.”
-H.L. Mencken

A guide to Jurassic World’s sexism controversy

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Some knob is always ready to get hysterical over portrayals.

“Always maintain your masculinity”: Misogynists freak out over Charlize Theron’s role in “Mad Max”

One of her worst offenses, according to MRA vlogger Aaron Clarey? “Charlize Theron’s character barked orders to Mad Max. Nobody barks orders to Mad Max.”

The genius then seems to be completely clueless that Max is Australian…

It’s whether men in America and around the world are going to be duped by explosions, fire tornadoes, and desert raiders into seeing what is guaranteed to be nothing more than feminist propaganda, while at the same time being insulted AND tricked into viewing a piece of American culture ruined and rewritten right in front of their very eyes.

American culture? Aaron? Have you even seen the original films? Are you even old enough to attend an R rated feature?

PS.

Having now seen Fury Road, I never did see Charlize even yell any orders at Max during the entire film, leaving me to believe that the imbecile hasn’t seen the film or any of the previous.

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