Posts Tagged ‘film’

Leaving HBO at the end of this month, you have time to catch it now.

This film is possibly the greatest action thriller ever made. The stunts put Hollywood to shame. Everything is real, kinetic, and life-endangering.

Whether or not you like Mel Gibson, he brought Mad Max to the world, and his world is brutal, chaotic, and sublime. The Road Warrior stood as untouchable for thirty years until George Miller delivered Mad Max: Fury Road in 2015, and we had something to finally compare it to.

The Humungous

The opening montage sequence is a bit dated in its style, and perhaps underwhelming as an opening. Start at the first frame after it, however, and all bets are off. The music also seemed a tad old school, but the action is jaw dropping and center stage.

The plot of The Road Warrior revolves around a siege, that of an old oil refinery in the desert, surrounded by The Humungous and his dogs of war. The refinery people have a small society, straining to keep civilization going in contrast to the scavengers of the wastelands. Max must decide which world he belongs to.

And he’s not a great guy.

But he’s not a bad guy either.

What he is is a damaged guy for a damaged world. And he keeps his word.

It’s interesting how everyone sees value in him, but not himself. He seems to consider himself worthless, a rat scavenging guzzoline wherever he can find it. That’s all he’s capable of aspiring to.

I cited The Road Warrior as a major influence on my 2014 novel Transfixion. There is also a siege and with a school bus lodged across the front gate of a school. I made sure there was a truck/car chase sequence or two as well. It truly was effective, if you believe the readers.

It’s not all about Max. Supporting characters make this movie. Top spot goes to the feral kid, whom you have to stop and just cheer for. The feral kid is amazing. We’d never seen him before or since, and he’s perfect. Max’s gyrocopter-flying sidekick is also a key man in the story. And the helicopter afforded magnificent aerial shots of desert chaos that make sense, and so you never think twice as to why they have all these grand overhead views. It’s just magnificent filmmaking.

The Road Warrior is must-see cinema. End of discussion.

Julian Assange documentary screening in London’s Curzon Soho Cinema

This film came out long before this blog existed, and so there was no entry for it. I was critical of the film for not going far enough, but it is required viewing today. Get it.

STREAM ONLINE

It is, of course, a satire about American propaganda and gullibility when it comes to WAR.

Covert Action Quarterly:

“Hollywood is Full of CIA Agents,” Says Ben Affleck

J. Giambrone

Midsommar Review

Okay, so the most trite buzzline imaginable is: Wicker Man for anthropology students. Now I know that’s reductionist assholery, but on a base level it could be perceived that way. They are literal anthropology students doing anthropology student stuff. This does bog it down a bit. And while some of the horror aesthetics annoyed me at the beginning, I was turned around when the contingent made their trek to northern Sweden.

THE WICKER MAN (1973)

Because, while The Wicker Man was firmly set against the return to pagan ritualism, Midsommar seems on the fence. Where spills and chills poured naturally from the conflict against the English detective and his invasion of their lands, in Midsommar it’s not all malevolence–or is it? There’s a sales pitch that accompanies the human sacrifices. I did like that part.

And the unstated anti-sales pitch for American “bros” and their culture deserves a nod. The…

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Oliver Stone 

I’m enclosing the letter Jim DiEugenio and I wrote in response to Rolling Stone’s attack on our film, “JFK Revisited.” –Tim Weiner’s review of “JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass” suffers from “Russiagate” paranoia, as do many of his colleagues embedded in our Government-Media world, wherein the malevolent Russians seem to be responsible not only for the election of Trump, but the continuing sabotage of our cyber-infrastructures. Supposedly wanting their glorious Communist Empire back, they are prepared to invade both Ukraine and NATO countries. Good vs. Evil scenarios seem to work for most American people. But Weiner goes far afield when he includes “JFK” in his contempt for so-called “tinfoil-hatted fabricators” who have no reason to believe the Warren Commission cover-up. Weiner has failed to update his tired angle on the assassination. In fact, the Russians were working successfully at a détente with JFK, leading to the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. When he was killed, Russian hopes — and the hopes of many liberated regions of the world (Egypt, India, Indonesia, and Africa) — were smashed as the hardliners in our Government once again protected their interests. (1) He accuses Jim DiEugenio, the writer of the documentary, and myself of falling for Russia’s trickery in using an Italian newspaper to blame Allen Dulles for his involvement in a military coup to overthrow Charles de Gaulle in ’61. But we did not use this Italian newspaper. We used David Talbot’s books, “The Devil’s Chessboard” and “Brothers,” The London Observer, and Weiner’s employer at that time, The New York Times — as well as French newspapers L’Express and Le Monde and sources close to de Gaulle like André Malraux and Alain Peyrefitte to pinpoint the enmity of Dulles, working with the mutinous generals against the policies of de Gaulle in Algeria. (2) Nor did Jim Garrison base his ideas about Kennedy’s assassination on that same marginal Italian newspaper. He did so by investigating the things Lee Harvey Oswald did in the summer of ’63 in New Orleans and the people he associated with. Authors like Jeff Morley (“The Ghost: The Secret Life of CIA Spymaster James Jesus Angleton”) and John Newman (“Oswald and the CIA”) have taken those discoveries further, and we interviewed both men in our film. Weiner does not mention either interview.(3) We largely relied on the database of documents that was released by the Assassination Records Review Board (1994-1998), which Weiner covered as a reporter for The New York Times, but did us no favors with his tepid interpretations of their work. We interviewed three technical experts who worked for that Board. And we display many documents the Board declassified. “JFK Revisited” is the first documentary to do this. We are not mystical or faith-based. We are data-based.Signed,Oliver Stone & Jim DiEugenio –My 1991 film “JFK” still bothers people like Tim Weiner deeply. Why? Because it’s true, and in its largest implications, it’s devastating. It defeats the meaning of their life’s work propping up the CIA.Based on our past ‘success’ with America’s major media, we have to assume Rolling Stone will not publish our letter on this seemingly taboo subject. And on that basis I publish this letter here first for those who care; it’s a worthy struggle to fact-check ill-intended slander and malice in the belief that we can seek and achieve the truth in the JFK murder for its own sake.




6 Stars



Arguably the best movie I have ever seen, you would be a fool to miss this. I must have seen between 3 and 5 thousand of the bastards.

This is bold, beautiful, and a masterpiece. Edgar Wright is now at the top of his game. Anya-Taylor Joy just delivers flawlessly. And the plot is quite a ride.

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I should mention my own project Time of Death has a similar worlds touching through a ghostly connection thing. It’s also about a first-year, unstable, artsy student. So, I was hooked entirely, as Edgar did it so well. The technical side is ahead of the viewer by far.

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You don’t need to know any more and risk spoilers reading internet crap like this. Just go see it.

Place (short)

Posted: October 21, 2021 in -
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Black & White (short)

Posted: October 17, 2021 in -
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