Posts Tagged ‘Hollywood’

278B6D8B00000578-0-image-m-41_1428989547576

Dennis Quaid, interrupted

Christian Bale, interrupted

(Bale for the win.)

tjfdm_presidentsanalyst

Ted Flicker Under Surveillance

Problems began when the FBI got ahold of the screenplay. Robert Evans claims he was visited by FBI Special Agents who didn’t appreciate their unflattering and incompetent portrayal in the film. When Evans denied their request to cease production, they began conducting surveillance on the film’s set. Evans refused their demands, but increasing pressure led to extensive overdubs during the film’s post-production phase: the FBI became the FBR, and the CIA became the CEA. Even the Telephone Company got wind of their negative portrayal in the film, and Evans believed that his telephone had begun to be monitored by either the Bureau or the phone company. Evans’ paranoia would ironically mirror that of James Coburn’s character in the film’s storyline.

dr-strange-drone-cartoon

ImageProxy

This just in…

An evening in Beverly Hills wouldn’t be complete without a few celebrity sightings. By attending the 24th Annual Death Penalty Focus (DPF) Awards Dinner on May 7 you will not only be supporting our efforts to end the death penalty, but you will also get to meet celebrities who share the same commitment to justice as you.

Hollywood often plays a significant role in bringing awareness of important social issues to the general public. Whether it’s TV shows and movies exploring our criminal justice system, or celebrities speaking out against injustice, Hollywood helps bring life and death issues into the public consciousness.

Death Row Stories, an 8-part CNN series produced by Jigsaw Productions and Sundance Productions, is a wonderful example of a show that explores the most serious questions about crime and punishment. Each episode profiles a different capital murder case, all of which raise concerns about capital punishment and the justice system in the United States.

I am honored that executive producers Alex Gibney, Brad Hebert and Laura Michalchyshyn will be representing Death Row Stories at our Awards Dinner to receive our Justice in the Media Award.

The DPF Awards Dinner attracts a lot of big time supporters who want to add their name, and where possible, their presence to the premier anti-death penalty event of the year. The list of dinner committee members this year includes Matt Damon, Russell Crowe,Alfre Woodard, Bryan Cranston, Bonnie Raitt, and Harry Belafonte. They are showing their support in the hope that you will join them in opposition to the death penalty. To see the entire list of dinner committee members click here.

Celebrities who have already confirmed their participation include DPF President Mike Farrell, Dinner Co-Chair Shelley Fabares, Master of Ceremonies John Fugelsang, and Award Presenter Amy Brenneman. Other distinguished honorees for the evening include Dale Baich, Assistant Federal Public Defender; the late Rabbi Leonard Beerman, founding DPF board member, and our special recognition recipients.

Seats are selling fast, so I hope you can reserve your place today. 

By attending our Annual Awards Dinner, you will directly contribute to our efforts to end the death penalty not only in California, but around the world. I hope you can join us.

Sincerely,


Matt Cherry
Executive Director

Scientology_590Most successful cult in Los Angeles

What level of fucktard does one have to be in the first place? Anyway, fun with nutcases…

goingclear

The Church of Scientology’s Vitriolic Reaction to ‘Going Clear’

“Most of the real vitriol is for the people who were in the film. They’ve received threats of physical harm, threats of having their homes taken away, threats of being forced into bankruptcy. They’re being followed by private eyes and surveilled.”

Rowell

Ex-Young & Restless Star Alleges She Was Spat on, Mocked With Afro Wig, Then Blackballed by Racist Soap

2013-3D-Gravity-Movie-Wallpaper

MY GRAVITY LAWSUIT AND HOW IT AFFECTS EVERY WRITER WHO SELLS TO HOLLYWOOD

Highly disturbing:

This is alarming on many levels, and the principles involved go far beyond my individual lawsuit. Every writer who sells film rights to Hollywood must now contend with the possibility that the studio they signed the contract with could be swallowed up by a larger company — and that parent company can then make a movie based on your book without compensating you. It means Hollywood contracts are worthless.