Posts Tagged ‘organizing’

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Interesting–I went looking for this article link, but it no longer exists. It was up for about 5 years!

Are ideas about organizing politically instead of camping in parks too radical?

 


2013 UNOCCUPIED

by Joe Giambrone

“Fight not unless the position is critical.
Sun Tzu, The Art of War

The ”Occupy” movement has apparently receded into the long night.  That may not be such a bad thing, as a new Phoenix can arise from different strategies, different emphases and different goals.  The structural challenges remain the same, and opposition is still needed.  What has been exposed as fruitless, however, is the idea of occupying parks in chaotic sieges that signify nothing.

What were the benefits of occupying parks?  There was really only one, and that was publicity.  The utility of the tactic lay in attracting the media and achieving penetration into living rooms across the nation.  Once that was accomplished, there was no further benefit, and a whole laundry list of downside problems.  There is a lesson here.

No ruler should put troops into the field merely to gratify his own spleen; no general should fight a battle simply out of pique.
-Sun Tzu

Your opponents know their strategies and tactics.  They’ve been doing it for a lot longer than you have.  Centuries.  When I listened to the delusional pronouncements of “occupiers” on how they were overthrowing “capitalism” and building a new society from the ground up, already it was obvious that it was over before it had begun.  The revolution would not be televised, and this revolution would not even metastasize.

By what chain of cause and effect was camping in the city park going to overthrow anything whatsoever?  Clearly, this was a public-relations stunt, and nothing more.  It would come and go like any other minor event.

Why the name Occupy?

Websters says, “to take or hold possession or control of,therefore to occupy is a militant endeavor.  Armies occupy.  The US military and NATO occupy Afghanistan and other foreign lands.

The Occupy Movement – from its inception – intended to take public spaces and hold them.  It is in the DNA of the movement.  It was born from aggression and a belligerent posture, the mindset of an invading army.   What these occupiers intended to do once they seized the spaces is less clear – even today.

Sun Tzu tells of the key components, which determine the success of any campaign.  These include:

“The Moral Law causes the people to be in complete accord with their ruler, so that they will follow him regardless of their lives, undismayed by any danger.”
Sun Tzu

Sing it now.  “One, two, three, what are we fightin’ for?”

The Occupy Movement made some initial assumptions that never did pan out and strike gold.  Firstly, that it would be a leaderless movement, with equal time given to every lunatic street vagrant who showed up.  Secondly, that the rest of the population, the proverbial “99%,” was automatically on their side, because they said so.  It wasn’t.  Thirdly, that electoral politics was history and no longer mattered.  It does.

How did the general population respond to the movement’s strategy of seizing parks, to the idea of “occupation” itself?

We know that in the case of Zuccotti Park, in New York City, the main legal complaint brought against the encampment was that they had taken the space to the exclusion of everyone else, and for an undefined amount of time.  Some citizens were arguably denied use of the public space as a result of this occupation.  Frisbee games may have been cancelled.  This legal maneuver led to the November 2011 raid and eviction of the encampment.

Was this a violation of the First Amendment?  The right to peaceably assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances?  Quite possibly so.  Perhaps this section of the Bill of Rights has been erased now, but do self-styled “anarchists” care about concepts like the Constitution in the first place?   Do they accept the legitimacy of government in any form?  This ties into the third assumption listed above: electoral politics matters.  Who is in charge matters.  The judges who are appointed to hear these cases also matter.

It was never apparent at occupations that the protesters were petitioning the government for a redress of grievances.  So what were they doing?  Open question.

The website/magazine  “Adbusters”  is credited with originally launching their movement, to some degree.   From this opaque organization some anonymous person described the downfall of Zuccotti Park:

 We wanted a Tahrir moment, an American Spring, a new vision of the future, and they attacked us in Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011 in the dead of the night with military precision.

Ignoring the absolute mess that is Egypt today, how is Zuccotti Park in any way analogous to Tahrir Square?  The square was a short march to the presidential palace in the center of Cairo.  The marchers had a single consistent demand: to overthrow Mubarak.  They disgraced him and overthrew him when the shifting alliances of the military and security apparatus found that they could maintain control without the old corrupt bastard.

There is nothing in the Occupy encampment of Zuccotti Park that could even be close to analogous to the Egyptian situation.  They were not even in the capital city, nor even voicing opposition to Barack Obama!  The parameters of their protest were so varied and so distant from the Egyptian uprising that the two can scarcely be compared to one another.

FJziSImage by OccupyWallSt

Occupy seemed to occupy for the sake of occupying.  Some occupiers argued that they were building a new society at the camps, a new way of organizing mankind, without capitalism.  They said this with a straight face, so we should believe they meant it.  They were certainly not building a viable political party to replace the people in charge.

The Occupy Movement first caught my attention when they promised a new congressional convention in Washington DC, scheduled for July 4th of 2012, if the Wall Street serial rapists weren’t dealt with by then.  They were going to challenge the integrity of the federal government with representatives from every congressional district, etc.  That seemed like a clear and reasonable enough demand to take them seriously, at the time.  Not soon after, this proposal disintegrated and was mostly forgotten about.  The trials and tribulations of police incursions took center stage.  The camps were swept away by Obama’s black shirts, but by then these tent cities were just hanging on for the sake of hanging on.  Nothing was happening, politically, except that the embarrassments needed to be hosed out of sight before election time.   When July 4th finally did roll around, it was a barely noticed anti-climax.  A few hundred showed up, perhaps a few thousand.  It was officially over.  The “occupy movement” had failed.

Never Achieved Legitimacy

Claiming you represent 99% of the people is not the same as actually representing the people.  This was a fundamental disconnect, born of utopian fantasies.  It was easy to remain skeptical of such bold claims that lacked evidence, that lacked gravitas.

How does one gain legitimacy in a democracy?  One gets millions of people to vote for them and wins the election.   Similarly, in parliamentary systems, one gets votes for one’s party to establish some proportional representation in the government.  The entire population is permitted to participate, and vote fraud is discouraged and policed.

While the Occupy Movement claimed to have true democracy as their guiding principle, the notion that their own version of democracy was limited to the people present at the assembly, to the exclusion of the rest of the nation, doesn’t seemed to have registered.  By eschewing electoral politics, they in fact disregarded an important democratic principle and ignored the overwhelming majority of the nation.  Less than one percent of the American people participated in these occupations, rendering their “true” democracy to just a hollow exercise of their own little 1%.

Love him or hate him, Obama took in nearly 60 million votes in the 2012 race.  The Occupy candidate received – zero.  There was no Occupy candidate.  Not in that race, not in any race.  The Occupy Movement rejected the one avenue for achieving power in the United States legitimately, and that is by convincing a majority to elect them into office.  There has yet to be a dog catcher elected from the Occupy Party.  So why should anyone take them or their politics seriously?

To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.
-Sun Tzu

Occupy, to me, was always devoid of coherence.   By rejecting electoral politics, the end result was preordained.  They would change nothing.  They would be given the big black boot eventually, one way or another.  After months of lingering, they wore out their welcomes.   Perhaps this movement did more harm than good.  Protest is now criminalized, and police departments across the nation have been militarized and emboldened into discarding Constitutional Amendments at will.   The incoherence of the Occupiers served to denigrate and even delegitimize real critical opposition to the crimes of the government and its corporate overlords.  That’s because Occupy never had anything to offer the general population except camping in parks with signs, a publicity stunt that went on far too long.

Lessons for the future include changing strategy.  For starters: reform over revolution.  I’ve confronted some anarchists on their grand visions of smashing the state, as if that would be a positive thing and beyond debate.  Suffice to say, they don’t have the numbers, and they never will.  Most Occupiers were not of the destroy-all-government variety and wanted to maintain a fair system of checks and balances.  It is these reformers who need to step up and take it forward into the electoral arena.

The left parties of the United States are fragmented, underfunded and even in pointless competition with one-another.  Some of their disputes concern the reform v. revolution question.  Reformers need to step up and join forces to combine existing third party structures into one umbrella party.  One.  The left can at least act in solidarity with itself if it ever hopes to convince middle of the road people that they are serious and offer a viable alternative.

Hence to fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.
Sun Tzu

The left can make a difference, and can even achieve power locally, where the real opportunities lie.  There have been too many showpiece presidential campaigns destined to score below 1% of the total.  Establish legitimacy town by town, state by state.  Until the masses have actually come to accept that you exist, you have no business hoping to win their votes.  It takes more than ideas.  It takes more than words.  It takes a lot more to play this game than a Facebook page.

The New Left Party, whatever its name, can employ some of the lessons of the failed Occupy Movement, and show up for a massive jubilee celebration – right back in those parks, to the delight of bored news reporters everywhere.  They might even face off against the tear gas cannons.  And then go home.  The point isn’t to “occupy,” but to make a splash across the world’s news cycles.

Then you do it again, another day, another occasion, another voter registration drive and house canvassing organizing session.  Real politics, on the ground, in the communities, and back into those parks to reclaim the First Amendment right to peaceably assemble.  Then go home.  Repeat as needed.

Therefore the skillful leader subdues the enemy’s troops without any fighting; he captures their cities without laying siege to them; he overthrows their kingdom without lengthy operations in the field. With his forces intact he will dispute the mastery of the Empire, and thus, without losing a man, his triumph will be complete.  This is the method of attacking by stratagem.
Sun Tzu, The Art of War


 

* “In that spirit, we welcome journalists, activists, educators and others to make free use of all original content authored by OccupyWallSt.org. As thanks, we ask only that you provide a link back to this site.”

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NEW BERNIE SANDERS APP DEMOCRATIZES ORGANIZING — AND PANICS PEOPLE UNFAMILIAR WITH ORGANIZING

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A Strategy to Grow

Joe Giambrone

I’ve written previously about a three-pronged strategy to increase numbers by creating tools to empower the base. Without these numbers the party will remain stagnated and ineffectual. That is the project. That is the task at hand.

My suggestions related to the US Green Party, but as Abby Martin pointed out to me, future change may need to come from another party altogether. The organizing principles are the same, to establish a grassroots party online, which is relatively cheap, efficient, and able to grow exponentially as needed.

While the current President received 63 million votes last November, the Korean Youtube music video Gangnam Style has “been viewed over 2.75 billion times.” Who could have predicted that before it happened?

Jill Stein appeared on many television screens in 2016, but one message was missing from most of her appearances:

Go and Register with the Green Party

Presidential campaigns focus on personalities and on transitory issues, but the simple call to recruit new people gets lost in the noise. That is a strategic blunder. All publicity should include a call to recruit the viewers.

A second important point to make is that registering does not mean one has to vote that way. It’s not mandatory, but it does send a message to the competing parties when one party’s affiliation grows (or conversely shrinks). This act is arguably as important as voting because it signals to the political class, to the ruling class, what America currently cares about.

The existing national Green Party infrastructure must put all of its attention and all of its resources toward building a viable party, which means millions—and then tens of millions—of new Greens. This goal is so obvious and vital that it seems to be routinely overlooked.

How to Drum Up New Members?

Before moving forward, it is imperative to study the competition. Here are three highly relevant websites:

https://www.gop.com
https://democrats.org
https://go.berniesanders.com

These should be mined for ideas, as they are well-designed and professional, and they appear to be winning the race.

But grassroots alternatives do not come with money, or checkbook activism, and so important differences must be acknowledged in terms of available resources. The only resource, which a grassroots movement can bank on today, is people power. Committed members are the strength of the party, but commitment without the tools to succeed is futile. This is already proven in election after election defeat.

Building Tools to Compete

Three tools need immediate implementation:

1. A landing page (much like the three websites listed above) will collect email addresses and names and help new people register with the party and join a community to leverage their efforts. People want to help, and they should be assisted. The website must aid with networking and provide information and high-quality content for the new members to share easily with their own circles.

2. A message forum can allow the entire party to communicate with itself in local groups, and additionally organized by issues and campaigns. In order to be effective the party must be organized in some kind of cohesive way. It is not today. A message board forum is a cheap, easy, proven mechanism for achieving this.

3. A media library is vital in today’s environment of flowing video, audio and images. It’s not enough to type text. Greens need the audio-visual content of the Party at their fingertips in order to create new content, be that videos, audio podcasts, graphic memes, or articles. The Party should be putting its best face forward and archiving all the quality imagery and other content that sells the Party to strangers.

Further, the landing page can be as bold as a complete reinvention and makeover of the Party: Green Party 2.0, for example. I lean toward the Greens because they have ballot access across the country—a huge hurdle overcome—as well as local-level victories to cite.

These three prongs of the larger strategy to recruit millions are easy to digest, logical, and bullet-proof. The only problem I see is that they are not being implemented. We cannot wait for a savior to come along some day but must act to defend our interests today by organizing.

The failure to offer viable progressive alternatives has allowed the United States to drift rightward, and now toward open fascism. Only by creating a movement that moves will we reverse this pendulum.

As the current regime destroys the last century’s progress, people will be motivated to resist. They need a place to resist, a real resistance that will not sell them out to the next corporatist warmonger who comes along from the DNC.

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http://www.joegiambrone.us

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When you talk with ignorant “Libertarians” who are in fact the recipients of the benefits of centuries of labor struggle–before they were even born–you see a mindless disconnect. They really don’t understand the topics they are so passionate about. Useful idiots of capitalist dogma.

Inside the Corporate Utopias Where Capitalism Rules and Labor Laws Don’t Apply

Donald Sutherland as President Snow in The Hunger Games: Catching Fir

“We did it in ’68.”
Donald Sutherland: ‘I want Hunger Games to stir up a revolution’

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