Posts Tagged ‘poverty’

poverty

 

It’s the end of America as you know it. I don’t feel fine, but not as impacted as the middle-class pseudo-intellectuals who are getting a major wake-up call. And they are long overdue.

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“The average cost of cancer drugs today is four times the median household income.”

This is real class war.

 

A Nobel Prize-Winning Cancer Therapy Will Be Unaffordable for Most Americans. Public Pharmaceuticals Can Help Change That.

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These lunatics continually push the envelope. It’s getting harder to write this shit.

Michigan GOP official: ‘Herd all the Indians’ to Detroit, build a fence and throw in corn

“I made a prediction a long time ago, and it’s come to pass. I said, ‘What we’re gonna do is turn Detroit into an Indian reservation, where we herd all the Indians into the city, build a fence around it, and then throw in the blankets and the corn.’”

 

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OXFAM recently noted:

Since 2015, the richest 1% has owned more wealth than the rest of the planet … Eight men now own the same amount of wealth as the poorest half of the world

AN ECONOMY FOR THE 99%

False assumption #1: The market is always right, and the role of governments should be minimized. In reality, the market has failed to prove itself the best way of organizing and valuing much of our common life or designing our common future. We have seen how corruption and cronyism distort markets at the expense of ordinary people and how the excessive growth of the financial sector exacerbates inequality. Privatization of public services such as health, education or water has been shown to exclude the poor, and especially women. 2.

False assumption #2: Corporations need to maximize profits and returns to shareholders at all costs. Maximizing profits disproportionately boosts the incomes of the already rich while putting unnecessary pressure on workers, farmers, consumers, suppliers, communities and the environment. Instead, there are many more constructive ways to organize businesses that contribute to greater prosperity for all, and plenty of existing examples of how to do this. 3.

False assumption #3: Extreme individual wealth is benign and a sign of success, and inequality is not relevant. Instead, the emergence of a new gilded age, with vast amounts of wealth concentrated in too few hands – the majority male – is economically inefficient, politically corrosive, and undermines our collective progress. A more equal distribution of wealth is necessary. 4.

False assumption #4: GDP growth should be the primary goal of policy making. Yet as Robert Kennedy said in 1968: „GDP measures everything except that which makes life worthwhile.‟ GDP fails to count the huge amount of unpaid work done by women across the world. It fails to take into account inequality, meaning that a country like Zambia can have high GDP growth at a time when the number of poor people actually increased. 5.

False assumption #5: Our economic model is gender-neutral. In fact, cuts in public services, job security and labour rights hurt women most. Women are disproportionately in the least secure and lowest-paid jobs and they also do most of the unpaid care work – which is not counted in GDP, but without which our economies would not function. 6.

False assumption #6: Our planet’s resources are limitless. This is not only a false assumption, but one which could lead to catastrophic consequences for our planet. Our economic model is based on exploiting our environment and ignoring the limits of what our planet can bear. It is an economic system that is a major driver of runaway climate change.

 

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Dr. King was murdered in a conspiracy. He was under complete surveillance, every aspect of his life under the microscope. The 1999 Civil Suit determined that James Earl Ray did not kill Dr. King, and it was a setup, a fraud, a frame-up.
 

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This fucking country…

69-year-old Vietnam vet with throat cancer freezes to death after company shuts off his gas

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Just so you know where all the money went after that “crash” of 2008. It seems not everyone crashed. In case you haven’t been paying attention…

According to Oxfam, the world’s rich are getting richer, leaving hundreds of millions of people facing a life “trapped in poverty” as global “inequality spirals out of control”.

Number of global billionaires has doubled since the financial crisis

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Super rich are getting super richer

“Data confirm that the shares of income and wealth held by affluent families are at modern historically high levels,” the report said. “The gains in income and wealth shares have been concentrated among the top few percentiles.”

The report also looked at Americans’ earnings. While the median income of all Americans fell by 5% between 2010 and 2013, the mean income increased by 4%. That means gains by the wealthiest segment of the population pulled up the average.

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Mexican Grindhouse

Critics are polarized over this one. It’s been on my Netflix queue since it released, and I finally got around to it. There are pluses and minuses here. On the one hand they took it seriously, with a budget, shot on film, a number of locations and an unconventional story. On the other, it feels confined and constrained anyway with a couple of self-indulgent drawn out, slow scenes at the beginning that scream “I’m an Auteur!”

The family is perhaps not so believable either, a bit too fantastical in their interpersonal relationships.  They seemed stilted and scripted. What sticks out as exceptional is the greater meaning they seem to represent: the old ways vs. the modern. The family is a throwback to Mexican Indian savages, with cannibal rituals that survive in the shadows. Good idea, but it seemed more influenced by American slasher gore than by any anthropological exploration of people on the fringes.

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The characters are simple, way too simple. Their crimes are blundering and incompetent, surely unrealistic in their sheer incompetence. How does a cannibal family survive that long with such poor hunting skills?

In the end it seems to be a nasty statement about eradicating the primitives and their ways. Not that the modern forces are any more competent. The police are fools as well. Everyone is poorly skilled and blundering about in this world. I’m not sure the makers have a very positive view of humanity at all.

Poverty plays a background role.  The family ends up in dire economic straits at the film’s inception.  They live in a bare hovel.  Even their victims are mostly poor, from street kids to streetwalker whores.  What’s more the police are motivated to solve the case to get a bonus and a promotion.  Is poverty a motivator for the cannibalism?  Not so much, it turns out.  They aren’t hunting to have enough to eat, but for a religious ritual that needs to occur before a time deadline.

It is what it is.  The story lingers about the next day, and so maybe there’s more to ponder.

We Are What We Are inspired a US remake as well, which raked in some higher scores over at the Tomato site.  Maybe it’s worth a look.

3/5

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Exposing the hypocrisy of the bourgeoisie.