Posts Tagged ‘sensor’

sony-a7s-4k-video-iso-409600-2 (1)

 

This may be the first still camera / movie cam I actually lust for.*  Passes for film in my book, and it does low light to ISO…

 

 

wait for it…

 

 

400,000.

 

 

The sensor has something going for it you’ve never seen before.

 

Cost: $2500.  Ouch.  Nothing like the ridiculously priced Canon 1dc, which was the biggest ripoff I’d ever seen.  And this cam may blow it away.

 

* I have not seen the rolling shutter issue, as all shots are static and stable.  Needs more testing.

 

PS

I almost forgot!  Sony is claiming “15.3 stops” of dynamic range in raw mode.  Not sure the availability of recording RAW moving image, but we’ll see.  The ARRI Alexa has 14.3 stops; so ponder that, young grasshopper.

 

filmmaking

 

phfx_DragonClippedHighlightRollOffTest

Plus a fun makeup job.

Red Dragon changes the game and makes digital much more film like at the extremes — where brights clip.  Now 16+ stops of dynamic range are captured, making the brights roll off much more convincingly than most digital systems in use today.

Thread from cinematographer Phil Holland.

phfx_DragonHighlightRetentionTest

Bad digital highlight clipping looks like the stone sidewalk at the bottom right here:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Perhaps a more obvious example would be to just clip the levels from one of Phil Holland’s Dragon still frames (cropped area):

Red Dragon SensorA002_C021_10036V.0000201--crop

What most other sensors would captureA002_C021_10036V.0000201--crop--WITH CLIPPING

PS

One of the main problems with sensors clipping is that the three color channels do not clip equally, depending on the color of the light.  So you may get green channel or red channel clipping, but not the others.   This leads to ugly color shifts on faces in very bright hard highlights, such as noir styled lighting (Battlestar Galactica, anyone?).  High-contrast situations such as bright sunlight hitting actors’ faces, or bright sun through windows coming into a room, as well as through car windows and dense forests, can be torturous.  Also color gels and tungsten lighting are ways that the color shifts and can cause peaking on one channel but not the others.

Here is where a sensor like the Dragon is preferred, as it will not botch the image the way lesser sensors would perform.  This is more like film which naturally looks smoother as it flares to white.  In terms of really competing with film and even outperforming it, the Dragon is a milestone achievement (despite the claims of manufacturers and hardcore fanboys).

Another extreme dynamic range test of the new sensor.  Some exposure and grading choices that I wouldn’t have made but the camera is holding detail even in the extremes.

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Shane Hurlbut has put down his Canon 5d and picked up a BMC.  Here he offers good tips on testing out cameras and lighting to get a dialogue going with the cinematographer.  Good advice, videos and more.

Blackmagic Cinema Camera Tests

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This looks pretty damn good, the promise made 6 years ago now realized.

 

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Hey smalltime indie filmmaker.  You know there’s wiggly jello in your image.  Check this.  A new filter in Adobe CS6 makes it all magic again (in these tests anyway).

Discussion about CMOS sensor rolling shutter issues.  Well, there are lots of discussions, but this is a pretty good fix.