Posts Tagged ‘third world’

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When you talk with ignorant “Libertarians” who are in fact the recipients of the benefits of centuries of labor struggle–before they were even born–you see a mindless disconnect. They really don’t understand the topics they are so passionate about. Useful idiots of capitalist dogma.

Inside the Corporate Utopias Where Capitalism Rules and Labor Laws Don’t Apply

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Revolution Goes Global

by Joe Giambrone

Elysium Unspoiled

A desolate third world wasteland.  A gated, auspicious, white people paradise.  Slave sweatshop.  Tea and martinis.  Not all that implausible, but Elysium represents the ultimate gated community, while the third world has become the entire earth.

This fundamental class distinction leads to inevitable class conflict in Neil Blomkamp’s follow up to District 9, a similarly weighty sci-fi film.  Both films take on issues of global significance, particularly immigration, apartheid and capitalist exploitation of the underclass.  Blomkamp strikes a blow for the rest of humanity, and Elysium is a very good film, bordering on greatness.  For an action sci-fi thriller, it delivers the battles, the archetypes and the desperation of the world.  I heartily recommend seeing it.

Elysium With Spoilers

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end-of-poverty-movie

Imperial crimes continue today. The real causes of poverty around the world, and its symbiotic relationship to obscene wealth.

 

The aphorism “The poor are always with us” dates back to the New Testament, but while the phrase is still sadly apt in the 21st century, few seem to be able to explain why poverty is so widespread. Activist filmmaker Philippe Diaz examines the history and impact of economic inequality in the third world in the documentary The End of Poverty?, and makes the compelling argument that it’s not an accident or simple bad luck that has created a growing underclass around the world.

Diaz traces the growth of global poverty back to colonization in the 15th century, and features interviews with a number of economists, sociologists, and historians who explain how poverty is the clear consequence of free-market economic policies that allow powerful nations to exploit poorer countries for their assets and keep money in the hands of the wealthy rather than distributing it more equitably to the people who have helped them gain their fortunes.

Diaz also explores how wealthy nations (especially the United States) seize a disproportionate share of the world’s natural resources, and how this imbalance is having a dire impact on the environment as well as the economy. The End of Poverty? was an official selection at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival.

 

Dole’s Assault on the First Amendment:

Big Boys Gone Bananas

The film they tried to censor out of existence:
http://www.bananasthemovie.com/

Bananas

Agricultural workers poisoned by a US corporation.