Posts Tagged ‘torure’

pic

The Guardian today posted an investigation and a documentary film on the architects of the “Salvador Option” and the death squads of Iraq. Col. James Steele and Gen. David Petraus, Donald Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowitz, Dick Chency, the names are expected but for Steele. The documentary highlights Steele’s atrocities from Vietnam through Central America on his way to Baghdad.

From El Salvador to Iraq: Washington’s man behind brutal police squads


Numerous witnesses are on the record. I have one complaint, however, and that is a bogus civilian casualty count mentioned near the beginning of the film. A total of 130,000 Iraqis is stated as some kind of fact with no discussion or examination. This is likely the US military’s own body count; ironically from an invading force that bragged “we don’t do body counts” (Gen. Tommy Franks).

 

Iraq War Casualties

Lancet survey
601,027 violent deaths out of 654,965 excess deaths

Opinion Research Business survey
1,033,000 deaths as a result of the conflict
 

evil-uncle-sam

 

Imperial Propaganda: Our Highest Achievement

Joe Giambrone

Hollywood likes to pretend that things aren’t political when they are.  It’s that bi-partisan nationalist myth that if both corporate parties agree to cheer for the empire, then everyone cheers for the empire.  It’s gotten so bad now that races like the Oscars and the Writer’s Guild screenwriting award are tight contests between one CIA propaganda film and another CIA propaganda film.  The first one helps to demonize Iranians and set up the next World War scenario, while the second film fraudulently promotes the effectiveness of state-sanctioned torture crimes.

If there ever was a time for loud disgust and rejection of the Hollywood / Military-Industrial-Complex, this would seem to be it (contact@oscars.org).  Naomi Wolf made a comparison of Zero Dark Thirtys creators Bigelow and Boal to Nazi filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl (Triumph of the Will).  That, to me, seems inappropriately offensive to Leni Riefenstahl.  The good German filmmaker never promoted torture through deception.  Nor was Triumph a call to war.  The film was simply an expression of German patriotism and strength, rebirth from the ashes of World War I.  The current insidious crop of propaganda, as in the CIA’s leaking of fictional scenes about locating Osama Bin Laden through torture extraction, are arguably more damaging and less defensible than Riefenstahl’s upfront and blatant homage to Hitler’s leadership.

The Zero Dark Thirty scandal should be common knowledge by now, but here is what the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence wrote to Sony Pictures about it:

“We believe the film is grossly inaccurate and misleading in its suggestion that torture resulted in information that led to the location of Usama bin Laden…  Instead, the CIA learned of the existence of the courier, his true name and location through means unrelated to the CIA detention and interrogation program.”

The filmmakers had every opportunity to explore the issue more fully, instead of relying on the “firsthand accounts” of the torturers themselves, and/or their allies within the Central Intelligence Agency.  Notably, torturers are felons and war criminals.  Those who know about their crimes and help cover them up are guilty of conspiracy to torture.  Thus, these self-serving fairy tales that illegal torture led to the desired results (bin Laden) are tangled up with the motivation to protect war criminals from prosecution.  Not only does this claim of successful torture help insulate the guilty from legal prosecution, it also helps to promote further criminal acts of torture in the future.

Once this red flag issue was raised by the Senate, the filmmakers could have taken a second look at what they had put up on screens and reassessed the veracity of their material and the way it was being sold to the world.  Instead they doubled down.  Bigelow and Boal want it both ways, extraordinary access to CIA storytellers for a documentary-like “factual” telling of the bin Laden execution, but they also want license to claim that it’s just a movie and can therefore take all the liberties they please.

Jessica Chastain, who plays a state-employed torturer/murderer, who also allegedly located Osama bin Laden, said:

“I’m afraid to get called in front of a Senate committee… In my opinion, this is a very accurate film… I think it’s important to note the film is not a documentary.”

In a nutshell, that’s the Zero Dark Thirty defense.  It’s a highly sourced “very accurate film,” but we can take all the liberties we like because it’s not a documentary, and so if we made up a case for torture based on the lies of professional liars in the CIA, then oops.

Mark Boal went so far as to mock the Senate Intelligence Committee, at the NY Film Critic’s Circle:

“In case anyone is asking, we stand by the film… Apparently, the French government will be investigating Les Mis.”

Any controversy over the picture seems to help its box office, as more uninformed people hear about it.  The filmmakers themselves suffer no penalty as a result of misleading a large number of people on torture, to accept torture, to accept a secretive criminal state that tortures with impunity.

Kathryn Bigelow’s wrapped-in-the-flag defense of the film:

“Bin Laden… was defeated by ordinary Americans who fought bravely even as they sometimes crossed moral lines, who labored greatly and intently, who gave all of themselves in both victory and defeat, in life and in death, for the defense of this nation.” (emphasis in original)

Nice propaganda trick at the end equating those who “gave all of themselves” and “death” with the individuals who “sometimes crossed moral lines.”  Everyone’s dirty; you see.  All heroes are torturers; so it’s okay.

Bigelow’s half-assed response to getting called out by the Senate for putting false torture results into her film, is to say:

“Torture was, however, as we all know, employed in the early years of the hunt. That doesn’t mean it was the key to finding Bin Laden. It means it is a part of the story we couldn’t ignore. War, obviously, isn’t pretty, and we were not interested in portraying this military action as free of moral consequences.” (emphasis added)

Ignore?  By her reasoning, because the Central Intelligence Agency tortured people, she was required to fit it into the plot somehow, whether it was relevant to the investigation or not.  That’s her excuse.  No matter that the scenes are fabrications, and the actual clues about bin Laden’s courier came from elsewhere (electronic surveillance, human intelligence, foreign services).

Bigelow told Charlie Rose, when asked the same question about the torture: “Well I think it’s important to tell a true story.”  Unfortunately, when confronted with the Senate investigation, truth quickly takes a back seat.

The truth Bigelow now clings to is that, “Experts disagree sharply on the facts and particulars of the intelligence hunt, and doubtlessly that debate will continue.”  To Kathryn Bigelow, the fact that the so-called “experts” she has sided with are torturer criminals with a vested interest in her portrayal of their crimes never occurs to her.  She can dismiss the entire matter as a “debate.”  Perhaps she no longer finds it “important to tell a true story?”

Continue

 

The Fact Not Fiction Campaign challenges the depravity of Zero Dark Thirty on moral grounds.  Created by the National Religious Campaign Against Torure.

 

[Editor’s Note: See our extensive coverage of the Zero Dark Thirty torture scandal here.]

Iraqis_tortured_wp-f300

The Great White Camel

by RANDY SHIELDS

Probably many people have read the informed and thoughtful commentary on the movie “Zero Dark Thirty” by Glenn Greenwald or Jane Mayeror Karen Greenberg.

But what you’re really wondering is: what does a scalawag, what does a completely unrepentant flame thrower and certified America-hater think about “Zero Dark Thirty”? Come, sit by me.

“Zero Dark Thirty,” like director Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (which I reviewed and contrasted with “Avatarhere), is about the trials and tribulations of American occupiers, torturers, death squads and empire builders — no Muslims need apply for any humanity, although they’re allowed to scream a lot and blow up shit. (In real life they scream a lot, too, because some party unknown to Bigelow keeps dropping bombs on them, day after day, year after year, decade after decade.)

First off, I think the critics of this movie are lost in minutia. They mistakenly credit Americans with a humanity which they don’t possess and assume that Americans will be unduly influenced by the movie’s depiction of torture when, in fact, more Americans support torture than are against it, according to this 2012 poll. More Americans support torture now than in 2007. Americans are a lost cause. Instead, let’s see the waterboard pitcher as half full and celebrate how the rest of the world might see this movie.

Two things stuck out for me about the movie, one at the very beginning and the other at the end. Watching the CIA torturers at work, waterboarding, beating, hanging a guy in stress positions, depriving him of sleep, confining him in a little box, the sexual humiliation, the blinding light and blaring music — all of it called to mind George Bernard Shaw’s observation on animal experimentation: that a race of people who would use something as barbarous as animal experiments to “save” themselves would be a race of people not worth saving. No matter what the CIA, director Kathryn Bigelow (don’t overlook that comma!) and screenwriter Mark Boales intended, that’s the real message (subliminal only if you’re an American) of “Zero Dark Thirty”: America isn’t worth saving. Creative artists don’t always know the forces and influences that they’re working under or the ultimate import and meaning of what they’re creating. History, someday even written by the working class, will judge the meaning of this film.

The definition of torture is “the infliction of pain to elicit information.” That’s why I’ve never had a problem calling animal experimenters torturers. Torture isn’t in the mind or the intent of the torturer, it’s what they do. They cause pain to get information. So the torturers in “Zero Dark Thirty” can go from being brutal to joking around in mere seconds. They aren’t foaming-at-the-mouth sadists 24/7 — they’re the war criminals standing behind us in the grocery line. It’s Hannah Arendt’s “banality of evil.”

If the experiments/torture didn’t actually start out this way, in the end it always becomes about the sick fuck craziness of the torturers/experimenters themselves, their desire to be obeyed and take absolute power and control over a helpless being’s life, not the search for truth or “cures” or “protecting the American people.” (It’s perfect symmetry that the “learned helplessness” experiments of University of Pennsylvania dog shocker Dr. Martin Seligman formed the “intellectual” basis of the Bush torture program.) “Zero Dark Thirty” shows American torturers in action, which is good. In fact, I think it would be dishonest of Bigelow and Boales to toss in the one or two FBI agents who objected to the systematic torture of one of hundreds (thousands?) of people and the torture trail that went all the way up to Yoo, Bybee, Addington, Cheney and Rumsfeld for their recommendations on torture techniques. This fucking movie should go down hard in the craw of the world — there was never any humanity or conscience or enough ”good Americans” involved to even be worth noting. I don’t recall those FBI agents making any arrests of the torturers or raising hell in the press at the time they witnessed the torture.

(An aside on waterboarding: as awful as waterboarding is in the movie, I think this written description — by a man who waterboarded himself — conveys the suffering better. In media interviews, director Bigelow never calls waterboarding torture — she always calls it ”enhanced interrogation.” People who don’t call waterboarding torture are either: 1) misinformed 2) diabolical servants of the American empire or 3) the New York Times. Waterboarding has been known as torture since at least the Spanish Inquisition and the Reagan Justice Department recognized it as such when it prosecuted Texas sheriff James Parker and three deputies for doing it to prisoners to obtain confessions back in 1983.)

The other thing that struck me about “Zero Dark Thirty” was no face to face confrontation with Osama bin Laden when the Navy SEALs are blowing up doors to his compound and proceeding up the different levels to his bedroom. Once there, everything gets even murkier, despite the night vision goggles worn by the SEALs. We don’t see the shot that fells bin Laden — we see him after he’s shot and laying on the floor as a SEAL pushes away two of his wives and then another SEAL pumps his supine body with a couple more bullets.

In a movie where plenty of dramatic license is taken, why no face to face confrontation with the great terrorist mastermind, with the Navy SEAL gunslinger at high midnight delivering vengeance for the smoking ashes of the twin towers? Why no look into bin Laden’s face as he realizes he is about to die in the “claws of the eagle” (America) as he said he probably would? Why no cathartic righteous justice? It doesn’t matter that maybe in “real life” it really was dark and difficult to see and that the one-to-one look in bin Laden’s eyes didn’t happen. These filmmakers don’t give a damn about “real life” and context when it comes to vilifying Muslims. Without fail, they care about drama and maximum emotional impact, from the real life September 11 911 callers which lead directly to the waterboarding to the CIA agent who bakes a cake for the man she thinks has been turned into an informant only to have him detonate a suicide vest and kill her and several other agents. This movie is all about drama but only within the confines of CIA propaganda.

27.024000,27.024000

The filmmakers would no doubt consider showing bin Laden’s face to be “glorifying” him. If bin Laden was shown to be afraid, he might draw some sympathy as an unarmed man executed in his bedroom by a death squad. If he was defiant, this might rev up his followers. So there must not be anything recognizably human about him. Code-named “Geronimo” by the American government, bin Laden must die like every indigenous person at the hands of cowboys and soldiers in American movies: just fall down dead like a cardboard cutout, incapable of expression, meaning or emotion. Only the White Man’s struggles are of any interest. Paradoxically, bin Laden remains a boogeyman who still holds so much power that even his death in a movie can’t be shown. Moby bin Laden’s dead and America, through Ahab Bigelow, is still afraid of him, a kind of Great White Camel, an obsession, a fiend who played a very useful role for American warmongers, from terror alerts always sounded near key political and legislative moments to being the supposed inspiration for every zealot with a Kalashnikov that America must spend a fortune exterminating — not a mere criminal who could have been easily been captured alive and tried in court.

America’s pursuit of the Great White Camel told us much more about ourselves than it did about him: we killed over one million Iraqis and wrecked their country which is still going on to this day, every day. We’ve now killed more Afghan civilians than Americans were killed on 9/11, and our drone strikes in Pakistan are making it a close second. The pursuit of the Great White Camel let the world see through a mirage: America isn’t a model to be emulated, it’s not a soaring eagle but a Chicken Little who scares easily and rushed to throw away every civil liberty and legal protection it had via the Patriot Act, the Military Commissions Act and the National Defense Authorization Act. A deluded cowardly and bullying country that will mainly fight you from 10,000 miles away and 20,000 feet above. A country whose dumb ass personality-cult liberals believe it’s a big improvement going from Bush capturing and torturing alleged “terrorists” to Barackus Obombus Caesar who captures no one and simply kills whoever he wants wherever he wants whenever he wants. It’s no coincidence that the CIA works with an Oscar-winning director on a film depicting torture now that its preferred modus operandi is extrajudicial assassination.

So why is this movie good for the world? Because it shows the ugly beast of America out of control, it comes to you bloody and crazed, so detached from reality that it believes its vices are virtues. It congratulates itself on its military prowess while the rest of the world sees sadistic torture, innocent people killed, nations’ sovereignty violated with impunity, international law and the Geneva Conventions jettisoned, lumbering death squads coming in the night from thousands of miles away to wreck your world, terrifying women and children and sometimes killing them. This movie’s message is: America makes the whole world insecure — therefore: arm yourselves to the teeth, preferably with nuclear weapons.

“Zero Dark Thirty” shows America swaggering and bragging, torturing and killing and proud of it. Americans love this shit because they have no empathy — they never imagine themselves on the receiving end of it. And they’re so damnably stupid and easy to manipulate that even when they are on the receiving end of it, as on 9/11, they don’t learn anything from it. Forget about any self-reflection as to why so many people in the world hate America. It was so easy for the ruling class to channel Americans’  bigotry onto Muslims and deflect away the normal healthy reaction of what should have been tremendous anger at the US government for not preventing 9/11 after all the trillions of dollars spent on “defense” and “security.” (Ralph Nader suggested four decades ago that cockpit doors on planes should be strengthened and locked. But what does he know compared to “bottom line” airline executives — he only gave us seat belts.) Almost three thousand people dead, a nation shellshocked and yet no one in our vast political/intelligence/military/surveillance state lost a day’s pay or got a reprimand. No one on top pays for anything in America whether it’s torture, financial fraud, illegal eavesdropping or negligent homicide. “Zero Dark Thirty” shows the incredible resources available to kill and destroy while Americans live in cardboard boxes in New York City and tents next to off-ramps in San Diego. A country whose infrastructure is so dilapidated that it’s not even safe for people to live under its bridges. A moral and social wasteland where more of its “true believers,” its trumpeted soldiers, kill themselves each year than are killed by its enemies. A country so fucked up, from its rotting Obama drone-head on down, that an increasing number of alienated citizens make their final statement the mass killing of total strangers, especially children. One great day it will be unanimous: three hundred million Americans will hate America.

Now wasn’t this a better movie review than some reverent cinephile talking about camera angles and lighting and references to other movies that weren’t worth seeing in the first place? The only way that I could be wrong about all of this, and the S & M America-lovers could have the last laugh, is if the goal of the American government, through propaganda vehicles like “Zero Dark Thirty,” is to cause as much hatred and blowback to America as possible in order to justify ever more “defense” and “security” spending, as if the whole reason for the being of America was the wildly successful business of plunder and murder. I flame. You decide. Have it your way at Vegan King.

Randy Shields can be reached at music2hi4thehumanear@gmail.com. His writings and art are collected at innagoddadadamdavegan.blogspot.com.

1302899465jackbauer

Arrest All Torturers

Joe Giambrone

“We are committed to building a world where human rights are respected and protected by the rule of law. Freedom from torture is an inalienable human right.”
–George W. Bush, June 26, 2003

Is this a nation of laws, or of unaccountable men – and women?

I’ve actually looked up the torture statutes while people like Joe Scarborough pontificate about whether the blatant lies of Zero Dark Thirty count as evidence that torture works.  It matters not a whit if torture “works” in some cases or not.  Torture is a felony crime Mr. Scarborough.  Those who commit it can receive 20 years in federal prison and the death penalty if their victim dies.  You see we have laws in this nation that aren’t subject to alteration by morons writing secret memos.

Some interesting tidbits from the US Criminal Code 18 USC Chapter 113C:

Sec. 2340A. Torture

-STATUTE-

(a) Offense. – Whoever outside the United States commits or attempts to commit torture shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both, and if death results to    any person from conduct prohibited by this subsection, shall be punished by death or imprisoned for any term of years or for life.

(b) Jurisdiction. – There is jurisdiction over the activity prohibited in subsection (a) if –

(1) the alleged offender is a national of the United States; or

(2) the alleged offender is present in the United States, irrespective of the nationality of the victim or alleged offender.

(c) Conspiracy. – A person who conspires to commit an offense under this section shall be subject to the same penalties (other than the penalty of death) as the penalties prescribed for the offense, the commission of which was the object of the conspiracy.

A faction within the Central Intelligence Agency has convinced Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal that torture is actually a good thing, whether it is a blatant felony crime and international war crime in violation of the Geneva Conventions and Convention Against Torture, or not.  These dutiful filmmakers have splattered it up on the screen, and the bedazzled critics salivate over the idea that torture (by glorious Americans) leads to results, despite centuries of evidence to the contrary.  And despite the facts of the bin Laden case, as disclosed by a Senate investigation.

Senators Feinstein and Levin debunk the central lie of Zero Dark Thirty, that the CIA allegedly tortured the information about bin Laden’s courier out of detainees:

“Feinstein and Levin wrote that the CIA didn’t first learn about the courier who led the U.S. to bin Laden’s hideout from detainees who were ‘subjected to coercive techniques.’ The techniques didn’t help identify the courier by name or the location of bin Laden’s compound, the senators said.

Instead, the CIA learned of the existence of the courier, his true name and location through means unrelated to the CIA detention and interrogation program,’ wrote Feinstein and Levin in the statement.”

I’m still waiting for one of these pro-torture people to actually read the 8th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution:

“Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”

No conventions required, this nation’s founding document outlawed the kidnapping of victims to “black sites” to be tortured.  This barbarism is obviously cruel AND unusual.  It is unconstitutional and has always been, since day one.

FBI Agents recommended that CIA interrogators be arrested.  However, the protection of these individuals by higher-ups in the Bush regime, making their torture atrocities unaccountable, has now won the day.  This grey area status quo, where felony crimes are simply not prosecuted, persists under Obama.  It will likely remain a most shameful, despicable, unlawful state of the nation until someone finally ARRESTS THE TORTURERS.

Jessica Chastain in Zero Dark Thirty

One such individual possibly destined for a torture trial under the US Code sec. 2340A is the star character of Zero Dark Thirty, named as “Maya,” but in real life apparently a CIA analyst by the name of Alfreda Frances Bikowsky (link updated 12/21/12).  While Kathryn Bigelow champions a “strong woman” character, as if strength in ordering kidnapping, torture and murder is something positive, this real life person has a rap sheet, which invites some scrutiny.

Some readers will have put the pieces together by now and heard about Bikowsky’s flight over to a “black site” in Poland to witness the torture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammad.  This was detailed in Jane Mayer’s investigation, The Dark Side.  Similarly, Bikowsky was responsible and at the heart of a “rendition” fiasco, where a German tourist named Khaled El-Masri was kidnapped, sodomized, beaten and confined to inhuman conditions for 5 months in another “black site” in Afghanistan.  When Ms. Bikowsky was informed by the German government that Mr. Masri was a legitimate tourist and that his passport was just fine and in order, she refused to allow his release.  She fought to keep an innocent man in a torture cell until other CIA personnel made an issue of it and brought it up to the CIA Director’s office.

That Mr. Obama takes a person like this and promotes her to the top of the chain is shocking on its face.  Bikowsky is reportedly now the head of the “Global Jihad Unit” within the CIA.  Barack Obama has indicated his explicit protection of torturer criminals by refusing to prosecute known felonies, and instead promotes the perpetrators to positions of even greater authority and power.  Is this a Fourth Reich?

Much of the progressive sphere is livid at Bigelow’s Osama bin Laden murder thriller, with its obvious jingoistic propaganda core.  The film expectedly ignores who this bin Laden person was and what he did, and whether he actually had any connection to the 9/11 attacks, which never actually appeared on his FBI Most Wanted page.  Isn’t anyone concerned about that?

Some doubt that bin Laden was even there that night, due to the extreme clampdown on evidence.  As in there is none proving Osama bin Laden was even alive at the time of the raid.  With no photographic evidence or forensic identification of the body, who knows?  Certainly not the public, who must take the government’s proclamations on faith.  A public reliant on the good faith of secretive, supreme, armed, dangerous and unaccountable rulers can’t seriously qualify as informed citizens of a democracy.

I’ve asked some far deeper questions about this bin Laden affair than the nuts and bolts of how bullets left chambers to enter his body.  The bin Laden network was used by America and its proxies, its puppet regimes in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, for many years.  Since Osama is said to have been living in Pakistan for nearly a decade, just half a mile from the Pakistani military academy in Abbotabad, we must explore the possibility that Pakistani intelligence wanted him there.  Knew he was there.  Protected him.  Worked with him.

Well, that’s odd seeing how United States taxpayers sent over at least $20.7 Billion since the 9/11 attacks, a substantial portion going directly to Pakistan’s military and intelligence arms (ISI).  Are we allowed to even ask obvious, glaring, questions like:  What is wrong with this picture?

CBS News and Dan Rather reported that Osama bin Laden was being treated at the Pakistani military hospital in Rawalpindi on September 10th of 2001.  Are we to assume that the Central Intelligence Agency missed that report?

Are we to assume that the CIA/ISI cozy relationship dating back to the war on the Soviet Union in the 1980s somehow disappeared one day?  The largest CIA operation in its history, funneling arms, terrorists – excuse me, “freedom fighters” – and planeloads of money to the Afghan Mujahadeen, served to expand the Pakistani intelligence arm ISI to gargantuan proportions, such that it controls the nation of Pakistan.  This CIA/Pakistan relationship suddenly had no meaning after 9/11/01?

The US “war on terrorism” would be far more credible if the US didn’t partner with terrorists every chance it had.  From Cubans in the 1960s, to Contras in the 1980s as well as the Mujahadeen Jihadis, to present-day relationships with MEK on the Iranian border, the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, whom the US/NATO just installed in power there, to the Free Syrian Army which is terrorizing and rampaging that nation daily and engaging in ethnic cleansing and mass murder, the US foreign policy record is one of supporting terrorist networks.  It plays dirty, ugly games “in the shadows” and most of the world outside its borders knows this full well.

That’s a story worth telling.  Not this self-serving CIA jingoistic propaganda about the white man’s burden to torture all comers for the alleged good of the world.  What would Osama bin Laden have revealed at a trial?  What relationships and contacts would have come to light?  Who protected him all those years?  We will never know, but can dance around like chimpanzees that he was murdered in cold blood, and his secrets neatly wrapped up and disposed of.

Torture is a felony.  It also produces bogus information.  Sometimes that’s the intent.  Oftentimes that’s the intent.  When people say what you tell them to say, it’s quite useful.  Saddam Hussein ordered the 9/11 attacks, don’t you know?

The practice of torture also implicates the torturers in crimes, creating a conspiracy of silence – yes real conspiracy, conspiracy fact, not “theory.”  Check the statute.  The conspiracy reaches all the way to the top, and today that means right to the desk of one Barack Hussein Obama.  By protecting torturers, Obama becomes part of the conspiracy to torture.  That is how the law works – for the little people anyway.  A two-tiered system of laws is what this exposes, one law for the political masters, and one law for everyone else.  That is conspiracy.  It violates the Constitution’s Eighth Amendment, as well as the Convention Against Torture, the Geneva Conventions and the US Code section 2340A above.

It’s long past time to restore the rule of law in this country, and to impeach those who commit ongoing crimes, including cover-up, hiding crimes from the congress, and conspiracy to torture prisoners of war.  A lot of honorable individuals in the FBI, the military and even inside the CIA itself have protested this criminal activity in the strongest possible terms.  Not everyone is on board this highway to hell, this descent to medieval barbarism championed by some criminal elements who should be prosecuted a.s.a.p.

I’m not a religious person, but I am a member of the National Religious Campaign Against Torture (nrcat.org).  They organize lobbying campaigns to remind the people in charge that we are watching.  It’s easy to join.  It’s harder to get through the thick skulls of the pro-torture faction in this country, the propagandists and apologists who intend to deceive and degrade us all.  I am sickened by this torture fad that civilized people must stand up and reject vociferously.

Torture of Brinvilliers, 17th Century

Reject along with it the Hollywood propaganda that promotes it, including Zero Dark Thirty, and Fox’s 24.  Torture is presented by Hollywood as a good thing nine times out of ten, and producers and screenwriters are morally and ethically responsible for these heinous lies that they tell their viewers.  Hold them accountable too.  Call out their sadism and criminality.

Arrest all torturers, lest we become a nation of depraved psychopaths.

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.”
-Edmund Burke