Posts Tagged ‘torutre’

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This is the first I’m hearing about this movie.

‘The Report’: Torture Meets Truth in Obama’s Washington

 

 

I’m not convinced from the trailer or the review that anyone involved understands why it happened. The character acts like it’s some unforeseen consequence that they can’t prosecute the people they tortured, when in reality that was the reason for doing so in the first place. Cover-up was the motive, the 9/11 cover-up to be more specific. It is 9/11 being not what we were sold that is at the heart of all this, and not any of the gibberish that officials spout. It’s not about “saving American lives.” It’s not about “getting information.”

When they had Abu Zubaydah talking with FBI interrogators–spilling the beans on Saudi and Pakistani military ties–he started telling them too much, and the CIA moved in and … drum rolldidn’t do anything with him for a month and a half. Then the CIA started torturing him. If they were so keen to get info, they would have asked him questions during that initial month and a half. They tipped their hand. The point was cover-up. Period. They made everything secret and beyond the reach of Congress and the public by committing glaring war crimes. And we all know no one has the balls to prosecute the CIA for war crimes.

 

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Must-read Douglas Valentine interview on CIA criminality.

The CIA: 70 Years of Organized Crime

 

Donohue was a typical first-generation CIA officer. He’d studied Comparative Religion at Columbia and understood symbolic transformation. He was a product and practitioner of Cook County politics who joined the CIA after World War Two when he perceived the Cold War as “a growth industry.” He had been the CIA’s station chief in the Philippines at the end of his career and, when I spoke to him, he was in business with a former Filipino Defense Minister. He was putting his contacts to good use, which is par for the course. It’s how corruption works for senior bureaucrats.

Donohue said the CIA doesn’t do anything unless it meets two criteria. The first criterion is “intelligence potential.” The program must benefit the CIA; maybe it tells them how to overthrow a government, or how to blackmail an official, or where a report is hidden, or how to get an agent across a border. The term “intelligence potential” means it has some use for the CIA. The second criterion is that it can be denied. If they can’t find a way to structure the program or operation so they can deny it, they won’t do it. Plausible denial can be as simple as providing an officer or asset with military cover. Then the CIA can say, “The army did it.”

Plausible denial is all about language. During Senate hearings into CIA assassination plots against Fidel Castro and other foreign leaders, the CIA’s erstwhile deputy director of operations Richard Bissell defined „plausible denial“ as “the use of circumlocution and euphemism in discussions where precise definitions would expose covert actions and bring them to an end.”

So as to 9/11, the CIA claims there were problems with “intelligence sharing.” That is the euphemism they use for hiding multiple Al Qaeda terrorists inside the US from arrest and the exposure of the plot. The circumlocution is passed onto gullible lackeys in the meida, like Ben Norton at Alternet, who faithfully call this deliberate hiding of hijackers “incompteence.” Like a Mighty Wurlitzer, the CIA plays gullible media lackeys to sing their tune and make their crimes go away–even Treason.

 

There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”

Bradley Manning

 

(The text of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning’s statement sent to president Obama. The text of this letter was read by defense attorney David Coombs following Manning’s sentencing on August 20)

The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.

I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing.

It was at this time I realized that (in) our efforts to meet the risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity.

We consciously elected to devalue human life both in Iraq and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.

In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror.

Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown out any logically based dissension, it is usually the American soldier that is given the order to carry out some ill-conceived mission.

Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracy — the Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyism, and the Japanese-American internment camps — to mention a few. I am confident that many of the actions since 9/11 will one day be viewed in a similar light.

As the late Howard Zinn once said, “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”

I understand that my actions violated the law; I regret if my actions hurt anyone or harmed the United States. It was never my intent to hurt anyone. I only wanted to help people. When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love for my country and a sense of duty to others.

If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society.

I will gladly pay that price if it means we could have a country that is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal.