Posts Tagged ‘warrant’

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Wow. They finally woke up.

Every single member of House votes to require warrants to access all emails

The House voted 419-0 on a bill requiring law enforcement to obtain a warrant to look through Americans’ emails, no matter how old they are. The bill would update a 30-year-old law that doesn’t require a warrant for emails older than 180 days.

A blow against the STASI Orwellian nightmare state?

Most of them are criminals, to be fair.

P-D-Scott

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we the people

The Feds granted themselves the right to put up phony cell phone towers to steal your data at will. Have audacity to claim it’s legal. The 4th Amendment dies.

Feds’ position on decoy cell-site towers continues anti-privacy theme.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is taking the position that court warrants are not required when deploying cell-site simulators in public places. Nicknamed “stingrays,” the devices are decoy cell towers that capture locations and identities of mobile phone users and can intercept calls and texts.

4TH AMENDMENT

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects,[a] against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

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I’ve been writing about this stuff for decades, and readers here should already know this stuff.  Hopefully they’re God damned mad about it and not going to take it anymore.

There’s a reason I cite George Orwell over and over again.

Washington Post:

U.S., British intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies in broad secret program

“The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio and video chats, photographs, e-mails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track foreign targets, according to a top-secret document obtained by The Washington Post.”

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The Moscow Times
FBI Probes Tsarnaev’s Contacts in Chechen Community

17 May 2013

The Moscow Times

FBI investigators have searched the home of a former Chechen separatist in Manchester, New Hampshire, after establishing that a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing met with him weeks before the terrorist attack that killed three and wounded 260 people last month.

Manchester police confirmed to Voice of America that Musa Khadzhimuradov’s home had been searched and that FBI agents were studying the content of hard drives on his computers.

Khadzhimuradov said secret service agents visited his home on Tuesday with a search warrant and took him to a local FBI office, where he gave samples of his DNA as well as fingerprints, RIA Novosti reported.

According to the FBI, bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev bought fireworks, which he allegedly used to make explosive devices for the bombing, in the town of Seabrook, which is located an hour’s drive from Manchester.

Tsarnaev also used to visit a shooting club in Manchester several blocks from Khadzhimuradov’s home, where he bought weapons and ammunition, the FBI said.Khadzhimuradov told U.S. investigators that he first met Tsarnaev in 2006 at an annual meeting of Boston’s Chechen community and that he had been in contact with him ever since.

Khadzhimuradov came to the U.S. in 2004 as a refugee. His lower body is paralyzed as a result of an injury received in Chechnya in 2001, where he was a personal bodyguard of separatist leader Akhmed Zakayev, currently living in exile in London.

UPDATE

Spelling is “Musa Khadzhimuratov” in US news reports.  Of which there are only a handful.

 

 

 

time-morsi

Egypt Issues Arrest Warrant For Jon Stewart

The Egyptian government has issued an arrest warrant for American comedian Jon Stewart, accusing him of blasphemy and fomenting “anti-Egyptian” sentiment.

There’s that “blasphemy” charge again. Isn’t theocracy grand?

Now I consider Stewart a sold out little shit and a propagandist for the empire, but arrest warrants for “blasphemy?” Really?

“According to a statement issued by Minister of Justice Ahmed Mekki, Stewart will also be charged with “contributing to the delinquency of an Egyptian” for his role in inspiring Youssef to challenge the Islamist regime.”

“Mr. Stewart may think he’s funny. But in reality he is destroying the moral fiber of Egypt with his numerous references to penises and openly flamboyant homosexuals like Larry Craig, Marcus Bachmann, and Lindsey Graham.”

 

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When even corporate media shouts, “The Internet is a surveillance state,” you know things are pretty bad out there.

Leahy has introduced a law to require warrants on government spying (day late dollar short?), which may or may not go anywhere:

“Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) introduced legislation on Tuesday that would require government officials to obtain a search warrant before accessing emails and other private online content.

Senate Bill

The ACLU is on the case, and this needs all that support we witnessed recently.  The fascist thugs will keep grabbing power until you grab it back.

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PS.

ACLU Lawsuit Challenges Warrantless Searches of Cell Phones

Suit Charges that Police Searches of Cellphones at Arrest Without a Warrant Violate Constitutional Rights of Arrestees, and their Friends, Family, and Colleagues

For Immediate Release: March 20, 2013

Today, the ACLU of Northern California filed suit against the City and County of San Francisco and San Francisco Police Chief Gregory Suhr on behalf of a civil rights activist, Bob Offer-Westort, whose cell phone was searched by the San Francisco Police Department without a warrant after he was arrested while engaging in peaceful civil disobedience.

The suit charges that warrantless cell phone searches at the time of arrest violate the constitutional rights not only of arrestees but also of their family, friends, co-workers, and anyone whose information is in their phones. This practice violates the right to privacy, and the right to speak freely without police listening in to what we say and who we talk to.

“Our mobile devices hold our emails, text messages, social media accounts, and information about our health, finances, and intimate matters of our lives. That’s sensitive information that police shouldn’t be able to get without a warrant,” said Linda Lye, staff attorney at the ACLU of Northern California. “The Constitution gives us the right to speak freely and know that police won’t have access to private communications in our cell phones unless there is a good reason.”

“Cell phones today are virtual home offices that contain personal, professional, and financial information not just about us, but about anyone we communicate with in any way. Police need a warrant to search our home office. Our cell phones should be treated the same way,” said Marley Degner, an attorney with the law firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

In January 2012, Offer-Westort was engaging in non-violent civil disobedience to protest a proposed city law that unfairly targeted homeless people. He was arrested after pitching a tent in San Francisco, as part of his protest. After he was arrested a police officer began scrolling through Offer-Westort’s text messages and reading them out loud. A longtime local activist, Offer-Westort worried that some of his community relationships could be damaged if private text messages he sent, and the people he communicated with, were made public.

“I rely on my cell phone to communicate. We shouldn’t have to worry that our personal information, and that of everyone in our phone, will be up for grabs every time we go to a political protest,” said Offer-Westort.

This is the first civil suit in California to challenge warrantless cell phone searches at arrest. In 2011, the California Supreme Court ruled in People v. Diaz that the police can search the cell phone of arrestees without violating the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. This suit brings a challenge under the California Constitution’s stronger guarantees of privacy and freedom from unreasonable search and seizure, as well as a challenge under the U.S. and California Constitutions’ guarantees of freedom of speech and association.

The lawsuit, Offer-Westort, et al. v. City and County of San Francisco, et al., was filed in the Superior Court of California, County of San Francisco. The law firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP is providing pro bono assistance in the suit.

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Or perhaps you like living in a police state, a large maximum security prison?

 

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The fascists are going to push and push until they clamp down on all human freedom. You have to keep pushing back.

“CISPA is back.
Remember when we defeated the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) last year? Well, it’s back with a vengeance. The leading Republican and Democrat on the U.S. House Intelligence subcommittee re-introduced the cybersnooping bill this week.

We beat it once. We can beat it again. Click here to tell your lawmakers to support privacy and oppose CISPA.”