Posts Tagged ‘waste’

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The Scientific and Technological Options Assessment reportreleased in November 2001 by the European Parliament showed that the combined effect of discharges from the La Hague and Sellafield reprocessing facilities constitutes “the world’s largest releases of radioactivity into the environment, corresponding to a large-scale nuclear accident every year.”

According to a Johnson State College student research paper, the United States began dumping radioactive waste in 1946, and the practice was carried on by 14 countries over a 48-year period. During this time, 80 dump sites were used all around the oceans.  Over that period it was estimated that radioactive dumping had reached a total of 84,000 terabecquerels.

“Using the world oceans as a dump” must stop.

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Trump administration facing lawsuit for allowing fracking companies to dump waste in Gulf of Mexico

 

It comes just months after the Environmental Protection Agency finalised a Clean Water Act allowing oil companies to offload unlimited amounts of waste into ocean basin

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that can do no wrong. This is from 2016.

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The United States Army’s finances are so jumbled it had to make trillions of dollars of improper accounting adjustments to create an illusion that its books are balanced.

$2.8 trillion in wrongful adjustments to accounting entries in one quarter alone in 2015, and $6.5 trillion for the year.

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Cost of violence hits $14 trillion in increasingly divided world

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Why does the US have 800 military bases around the world?

This is according to American University professor David Vine in his forthcoming book Base Nation, in which he seeks to quantify the financial, environmental, and human costs of keeping these bases open.

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“Vanity capital” is the new metric for narcissism, and analysts say its value worldwide is greater than Germany’s GDP

Whether $4.5 trillion is an accurate measure of how much people spend on purchases motivated in some way by vanity is debatable. But in the age of the selfie, it seems a safe bet that the number, whatever it may be, is growing.