Posts Tagged ‘young’

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – NO ENTRY FEE!

Calling all aspiring filmmakers! Have a great story to tell? We want to hear from you.

The AT&T Film Awards is an open competition seeking imaginative, undiscovered short films from aspiring filmmakers who want their voices heard. We are excited to announce the 3rd Edition of the competition – where we’re putting the spotlight on student filmmakers, and filmmakers creating great stories using mobile video cameras (e.g. smartphone, tablet, drone, GoPro).

Whether you’re an aspiring college or teen filmmaker, or an emerging indie creator focused on mobile filmmaking, we have a contest category for you.


AWARDS & PRIZES

STUDENT AWARDS: seeking short films from the next generation of storytellers, across the following categories:

Best Short Film – College Students

  • 1st Place:  $10,000 cash
  • 2nd Place:  $3,000 cash
  • 3rd Place:  $2,000 cash

Best Spanish-Language Short Film – College Students

  • Winner will participate in the Warner Bros summer program at the USC School of Cinematic Arts during the summer of 2018

Best Short Film – Youth, ages 13-18

  • 1st Place:   All-expense paid trip (with parent/guardian) to participate in a Fresh Films summer or spring break program approx. 5-8 days in length, and a Camera Equipment Kit
  • 2nd Place:  1-day Fresh Films workshop for winner and up to 9 friends in winner’s hometown, and a Camera Equipment Kit
  • 3rd Place:   Camera Equipment Kit

 

MOBILE TECH AWARDS: targeting original shorts filmed using emerging mobile video technologies (smartphones, tablets, drones, GoPro)

Best Short Film – Shot on Mobile

  • 1st Place:  $10,000 cash
  • 2nd Place:  $3,000 cash
  • 3rd Place:  $2,000 cash

ENTER TODAY

Enter your short today for your chance to win a share of up to $50,000 in cash prizes, scholarships, exposure, and a chance to take home the AT&T Film Awards trophy! We want to help you bring your passion project to life.

See Official Rules for full contest details.

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The future of propaganda is here, and it’s pretty awful.

GTA-ISIS: Militants hooking youngsters with ‘Jihad video game’ trailer

But I guess with the US Army pushing its own video game onto OUR youth, the idea caught on?

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Regular marijuana use bad for teens’ brains, study finds

While researching an article on this subject I found other studies from neuroscientists that suggest it may be true. The issue is the development of the frontal cortex of the brain, which is not fully cooked until about age 25. Marijuana may interfere with the connections being forged in that region. It is always better to be safe than sorry and to keep your substance abuse to a bare minimum. Young people may be significantly more at risk, and so be warned.

Frequent marijuana use can have a significant negative effect on the brains of teenagers and young adults, including cognitive decline, poor attention and memory, and decreased IQ, according to psychologists. “It needs to be emphasized that regular cannabis use, which we consider once a week, is not safe and may result in addiction and neurocognitive damage, especially in youth,” said one expert.

 

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Disposable Youth

Another indie look at America’s wasted young, a society that doesn’t value its next generation.  Little Birds fits neatly alongside other dystopian explorations such as Kids (1995), Thirteen (2003) and Suburbia (1983).

The story involves a girl stuck in a polluted hellhole and raging to break free and go to the city.  Juno Temple plays Lily, a wild and crazy teen, who will do anything to feel different and wanted.  Her best friend Allison enables her to escape the Salton Sea and run off to LA to find a particular street boy.  Once in LA, the kids subsist from petty crime to petty crime, and Lily falls instantly in love with the crazy lifestyle.

Juno Temple, recently also seen in Killer Joe, is pushing ahead with edgy, disturbing roles on the far side of sane.

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Little Birds is on DVD at the Redboxes and Netflix.

Bonus

Disposable street kid turned hero, Kai:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8XvNr5W1Qg